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. Renaissance Gothic. Architecture and the arts in northern Europe 1470–1540 , New Haven and London, Yale University Press, 2012. Kavaler E. M. Renaissance Gothic

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References [1] Bereczki Z. Hans Hammer’s sketchbook and the building technology of the late Gothic: A

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Abstract  

Margaret Atwood’s Lady Oracle is a novel extremely rich in Gothic resonances, making numerous approaches to the Gothicness of the book possible. My analysis will focus on the roots of protagonist Joan Foster’s fascination with the Gothic. What I intend to argue is that, in contrast with most analyses of the novel, the Gothic is present not only in the form of clichs which Joan (wrongfully) imposes on real people and real situations; in fact, it is not by mere chance that Joan turns to writing Costume Gothics in order to satisfy her desire for romance. The roots of her fascination with the genre lie with the two most influential people of her life: her mother Frances Delacourt and her surrogate mother Aunt Lou who educate her early into the female/maternal legacy of Gothic thinking which manifests itself in Joan’s views on all aspects of life: problems of selfhood, personal relationships as well as personal aspirations. Moreover, the fact that the Gothic permeates the lives and thoughts of all the significant female characters of the novel indicates that female existence as a whole is presented by Atwood as essentially and inevitably Gothic. I will pursue this line of argument by first discussing the significance of the two mother figures in Joan’s life as well as the process of Joan’s education into patterns of female existence that bear a striking resemblance to such patterns common enough in the Gothic. I will also show how the creative process of writing her Gothic novels as well as her “Lady Oracle” poems contributes to Joan’s understanding that the bonds that connect her with her mother are primarily bonds of love and not of hate as she thought before, and that under the disguise of apparent differences they do share whatever is essential about womanhood. It is through this realization that Joan can set herself free from the past – by coming to terms with it rather than discarding it – and may, thus, actually start working on her present.

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/92 , No. 1–2 , 1992 , pp. 35 – 40 . [9] Hoppe L. Late Gothic measure system in Hans Hammer’s portfolio (in Hungarian

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The overview study summarises in an updated context the findings of a long-term research into sepulchral sculpture in Moravia and Czech Silesia, which dealt primarily with whole-figure sepulchral monuments, ranging from examples dependent on fading Central European late Gothic tradition, through examples gradually influenced by early Renaissance italianising elements up to such forms that were marked by Italian and Nordic Mannerism. Based on a comprehensive regional and broader Central European style-critical comparison, applying the criteria of contemporary artistic influences, individual creative approach, craftsmanship routine and other indicia important for a work to be done, the study presents the efforts to incorporate works into circles given by a specific author or workshops, or to highlight the provenience ties of solitary works.

The study shows that despite the enormous loss of sepulchral monuments that have occurred in the past, Moravia and Czech Silesia excel in its numerous production of figural tombstones, which demonstrate the ability of the monitored area to accept and operate with new humanist and representative content, and by the existence of which the local sepulchral sculpture reached specific expression. In addition to eschatological significance and private memorial function, the sepulchral monuments of nobility served also as a family policy, whereby the privileged strata confirmed the old tradition; which contained a personal, genealogical, confessional and political reminder.

Despite the selective character of the study, the processed material brings findings that can contribute to deeper understanding of the overall picture of sepulchral tomb sculpture of the monitored area as well as to its evaluation in the national and European context.

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Eucharistic references in the representations of saints constitute a relatively unexplored segment within the iconography of the Holy Sacrament. This article analyses a number of hagiographical compositions from the Late Gothic wall paintings of Transylvania, which seem to carry eucharistic connotations, either through explicit references to the Sacrament (in the form of a monstrance, a chalice or host-shaped bread) or through subtler allusions to the sacrificial Body of Christ present in the Eucharist. The fact that most of these images are located in the sanctuaries of churches and are typically associated with other, more straightforward eucharistic imagery suggests conscious choices on the part of the inventors of the iconographic programs in adapting the subject matter of the wall paintings to the function of the given liturgical space.

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Abstract  

The use of thermal analysis in studying ancient mortars in English cathedrals is explained. Thermal analysis can be used to investigate both mortar and stone in dated structures. Analysis of ancient mortars show that though recarbonated, they remain soft, yielding to structural deformations. The use of hard (cement mortar) in modern renovation can result in micro-cracking in the stone and subsequent chemical attack from the atmosphere. Contrary to the literature, data developed in the present study suggests that most medieval mortars have reached a near total state of recarbonation.

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Építés - Építészettudomány
Authors: Krisztina Fehér, Balázs Halmos, and Brigitta Szilágyi

. Bucher 1968 Bucher , François : Design in Gothic Architecture: A Preliminary Assessment . Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 27 ( 1968 ) 1 . 49 – 71 . DOI: 10

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Abstract

Provostry in Székesfehérvár was destroyed in the time of the osmanic occupation of Hungary. Its relics have been uncovered by archaeological excavations since the 19th century, and this study deals with a short description of the history of the building based on the research results up to day. The problems of eventual traces of the support system of the church built in the first decades of the 11th century are here discussed as well as those concerning its western part. The periodization of the western building of the 11th century church (demolished in the 13th century) and the cloister in the south could be treated here for the first time. In connection with the great rebuilding of the church in the 12th century mainly the problem of the dating of great wall blocks, interpreted as fundaments for buttresses, are discussed. Contrary to the opinion of those who want to place these into the context of the great 11th century rebuilding, according to her their construction in the 11th century appears as the most probable. In another old question of the building history, int that of the enlarging the nave pillars in order of narrowing the middle space before its vaulting, she proposes a date under King Charles Robert. She also treats the identifictaion of the burial chapel of King Louis the Great and two big foundation and two places of foundations ont he south part, all of the 15th century. It is looking for further researches, how these walls, which apparently belonged to the the 15th century buttressing system of the church, were related to the building activities of King Mathias Corvinus.

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