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Septuagint, one comes to the following conclusion: Some passages have already been coined in the Greek version, but many of them have not been formed yet. The instances whose intermediate space is filled with an adversative or a causal particle can already be

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A Barlám és Jozafát regény 26-27. fejezetében Nákhór ál-tanúságtétele nem más, mint Aristeidés eltűntnek hitt Apológiájának átirata. A tanulmány az Apologia utóéletének áttekintése, és a „kölcsönzött szöveg" elbeszélésen belüli szerepének vizsgálatán túl, a védőbeszéd Iviron kódexben megőrzött - ez- idáig kiadatlan - görög és ófrancia nyelvű változatából is közöl részleteket.

The speech in the Barlaam and Josaphat novel, Nachor’s pseudo-testimony, is in fact a transcription of Aristides’ Apology, previously thought to be lost. Although it is mentioned by Eusebius and St. Jerome, the sermon was considered lost until 1878. In the 19th century, Armenian and Syriac translations came to light, as well as Greek papyrus fragments, also preserving excerpts from the original text of the sermon. In the light of the Greek fragments, it became clear that the romanced saint’s biography Barlaam and Josaphat also preserved a metaphrase of the sermon in Greek. Codex Iviron 463, which contains the Greek abridged version of the Barlaam novel, includes not only the Greek transcription of the Apology, but also its Old French translation. In addition to an overview of the afterlife of the Apology and an examination of the role of the “loaned text” within the narrative, this paper will also provide extracts from the heretofore unpublished Greek and Old French versions of the apology preserved in the Iviron codex.

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The present study intends to deal with the Greek translation of two Latin collections of maxims attributed presumably to Maximos Planudes. The first writing is the Roman Greek version of Ovidius’ poems, entitled Ars amatoria, Remedia amoris and Amores , reduced to sayings and rhetorical topoi. The second one is the translated version of Dicta Catonis in hexametric lines. The study follows the subsequent life of the original Latin texts up to the appearance of their translation. Afterwards it attempts to introduce the Greek versions in a nutshell, and on the basis of the analysis, to shed light on the motivation by which the Greek versions had come to being, also on their presumable function and their reception in a later period of time. In the case of the translation concerning the Ovidian text into Greek, it is not only the artistic motivation that is doubtful, but the identity of the author itself. This analysis intends to clarify this aspect as well, and as far as the radically revised text allows, to support the authorship of MP with further arguments.

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In the article the manuscript of the first Arabic prose work is being investigated. The author comes to the conclusion that it was written originally in Greek by somebody who was attached to one of the rhetoric schools in Syria. The Greek work contains the alleged correspondence between Aristotle and Alexander the Great. The Greek version of the novel in letters must be dated back to the sixth century A.D., thus the work is one of the last documents of the classical Greek literature. Through this novel one can get a better insight into the activity of the schools of rhetoric in the late Antiquity and the question of Pseudo-Aristotle's treatises.

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A tanulmány az Athós-hegyi Iviron 463-as jelzetű kétnyelvű (ógörög-ófrancia) bizánci kézirat különféle rétegeinek (ógörög főszöveg, miniatúrák, lapszélen szereplő ófrancia fordítás, ófrancia címsorok) összefüggéseit vizsgálja újabb megközelítésből, korábban nem vizsgált szempontok bevonásával: a miniatúrák és az ófrancia szövegben szereplő piros tintával kiemelt címsorok közötti kapcsolat feltárásával. A tanulmány a Barlám-regény görög változatait megőrző kódexek – ivironi kézirat szempontjából fontos – magyarázó címeit is áttekinti, a kéziratok közötti közös elemeket vizsgálja. Az elemzés az ivironi kódex készítésének körülményeivel kapcsolatban újabb fontos összefüggésekre világít rá.

The study examines the relations between different aspects (Ancient Greek main text, miniatures, Old French translation on the margins, Old French headlines) of the manuscript Iviron № 463, which is a bilingual (Ancient Greek-Old French) Byzantine manuscript kept on Mount Athos, from a new perspective by including formerly not investigated viewpoints: by exploring the relationship between the miniatures and the headlines that are highlighted by red ink in the Old French text. The study also mentions the explanatory inscriptions in codices that preserved the Greek versions of the Barlaam-romance and are relevant in connection with the Iviron manuscript, furthermore, it investigates the common features of the manuscripts. The analysis reveals new important relations regarding the circumstances of the creation of codex Iviron.

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The paper examines variation in the way the conceptualization of the vertical and the horizontal dimension is registered in original English and translated Greek press reports. It highlights intercultural variation which gives rise to different collocations across English source and Greek target press items. This intercultural variation may be one of the reasons why Greek learners’ EFL production is hard to reach near-native command of the counterpart English collocation system. A number of preferred image schemata emerge, which show that the English source text seems to favour vertical spatial relations, as opposed to the Greek target version, which seems to favour horizontal spatial relations. The Greek version of the data tends to blur the vertical, occasionally in favour of the horizontal. The findings raise awareness of spatial reasoning modifications in translation and shed light on intercultural awareness in interlingual mediation situations, such as EFL, ESP or translation settings. Parallel data (source and target versions of texts) can highlight aspects of shifts in translation situations, with far-reaching consequences in different areas of application.

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The idiom of the scales of justiceis commonly known and widely used. Iustitia can frequently be seen in different representations holding scales in her hand. The scales as a means or a symbol of justice (justness) or the administration of justice can be encountered in various places in Greek literature, one of its earliest instances being the Homeric Hermes' Hymn (Dikés talanta). According to these loci Zeus holds the scales of Diké, that is to say, the scales of justice in his hand. In the Iliad (23, 109-213) one may come across a scene presented in context, thus suitable for being more amply analysed, in which Zeus is pronouncing justice over the heroes using a pair of scales. In search of the meaning of Dikés talanta, this study tries to clarify the concept of law and justice (justness) in Homeric epic (I.), then by a structural (II.) and comparative analysis (III.) of certain lines of the weighing scene, decisive in the combat of Achilles and Hector, it formulates a few remarks on the origin and meaning of the concept of the scales of justice. One cannot claim that this idea of Egyptian religion had been transferred in its entirety into Greek thinking, but it is not surprising, as one can barely encounter an unaltered Egyptian borrowing in Greek mythological thinking. Nonetheless, some Egyptian influence, possibly with Cretan transmission, can be detected in the development of the Greek versions of psykhostasia and kerostasia. Pictorial as well as textual manifestations of such influence can be found on the one hand in vase-paintings, and on the other hand-undergoing a specific alteration of aspect in the form of kerostasia-in Homer, who paved the way for the scales of justice of Zeus and Iuppiter to become the symbol of Diké and Iustitia, and subsequently of the administration of justice itself.

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors:
Engin Karadağ
,
Şule Betül Tosuntaş
,
Evren Erzen
,
Pinar Duru
,
Nalan Bostan
,
Berrak Mizrak Şahin
,
İlkay Çulha
, and
Burcu Babadağ

. London: Sage Frangos , C. , Frangos , C. & Kiohos , A. ( 2010 ). Internet addiction among Greek university students: Demographic associations with the phenomenon, using the Greek

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, Dafouli, Braimiotis, Mouzas, & Angelopoulos, 2008 ; Stavropoulos et al., 2013 ) an exploratory factor analysis was conducted. For the Greek version of the YDQ, two authors ( Frangos et al., 2010 ; Stavropoulos et al., 2013 ) described a two

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, Septuagintal Dn than the Theodotionic Greek version. Nevertheless, at Dn 3:17 colo does seem to derive from Theodotionic λατρεύω rather than from Septuagintal φοβέομαι. Tertullian tends to translate φοβέομαι with timeo or metuo. For instance, one finds φοβέομαι

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