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technologies is the high hydrostatic pressure (HHP). Nutritionally, it enhances the intake of dietary nutrients in human by converting the complex ones into smaller ones ( McInerney et al., 2007 ). Applications of HHP in food industries includes reduction in

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High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) technology, as a promising alternative of thermal-treatment and chemical preservatives, can be used to produce minimally processed foods. It has the advantage of affecting only non-covalent bonds of macromolecules in foods, and thus preserves nutritional components, taste, and flavour exceptionally well. However, HHP also influences enzymatic reactions of food. Although some of these changes are often beneficial, monitoring the potential effects of high pressure treatments — especially in the field of product and technology development — is essential. The aim of this study was to point out some parameters of high hydrostatic pressure technique (pressure, temperature, build-up time, holding time, number of cycles) that can substantially impact the sensory properties of treated products.

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The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing (at 450 or 600 MPa for 300 s) on microbial quality as well as on organoleptic properties of fish salad with mayonnaise during 26 days of storage at 5 and 10 °C. The salad contained diced smoked trout fish, mayonnaise, and different kinds of spices. These freshly made salads usually have only a couple of days of shelf life. The HHP treatment basically did not affect the physical and organoleptic characteristics of the fish salad with mayonnaise. At both storage temperatures, the HHP treated samples showed enhanced safety and increased shelf-life up to 3 weeks.

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Progress in Agricultural Engineering Sciences
Authors:
István Dalmadi
,
Dávid Kántor
,
Kai Wolz
,
Katalin Polyák-Fehér
,
Klára Pásztor-Huszár
,
József Farkas
, and
András Fekete

High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) processing technology offers the possibility to preserve quality attributes. Objective test methods describing quality in a complex form have an important role in the development of new products and in the quality assurance of different technologies. Therefore, research was performed to compare the effects of HHP treatment and heat pasteurization on visual appearance, volatile composition, taste and texture properties of strawberry purees measured by sensorial and objective methods. Sensory evaluation did not show significant differences between samples. Similar result was obtained from the color measurements. Viscosity of purees changed only slightly as a result of the treatments. Electronic nose and electronic tongue were found to be promising tools for discrimination of strawberry purees treated by different levels of high hydrostatic pressure or thermal treatment. Canonical discriminant analysis showed that control and “600 MPa for 5 minutes” samples were quite similar. Samples treated by 600 MPa for 15 minutes were distinguished from the above mentioned ones. The heat treated samples (80°C for 5 and 15 minutes) were definitely separated from the control samples. Fusion of the data from the electronic nose and tongue showed the same trend and improved the classification of the treated puree samples.

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, at 100 °C (Lainox VE051P) M Microwave oven treated for 3 min at 85 ºC, 100 W, A3 (vegetable mode) H HHP treated for 3 min at 20 ºC, 300 MPa (Resato B2441) U UV light treated for 15 min at 20 ºC, Power: 30 W, 312 nm (VL-115.M) Fig. 1. Images of the

Open access
Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
B. Csehi
,
B. Salamon
,
T. Csurka
,
E. Szerdahelyi
,
L. Friedrich
, and
K. Pásztor-Huszár

it is used as a food ingredient ( Toldrà et al., 2004 , 2008 ). High hydrostatic pressure treatment (HHP) can be suitable for this. HHP is a gentle food preservation process, during treatments the microorganisms in food are partially or completely

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they are very sensitive to mechanical damage and mould contamination. During transport, processing, and storage they easily lose their sensory qualities (colour, texture, and flavour) ( Gao et al., 2016 ). HHP processing is a good alternative to

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Abstract  

High hydrostatic pressure (HHP) has been investigated as an alternative to thermal processing for food preservation. HHP has been known to affect high molecular weight polymers causing phase change. Starch is gelatinized at a pressure on the order of 600–700 MPa, at 25 °C. Gelatinized starch recrystallizes during storage affecting the texture and shelf life of food products. The effect of HHP processing on the crystallization of starches from different botanical origins during storage at 4 and 23 °C was investigated. Crystallization kinetics of HHP treated wheat and corn starch gels were compared using DSC. The effect of crystallization on structure was evaluated in terms of storage modulus. The rate of retrogradation depended on the storage temperature (23 °C and 4 °C) and the botanical origin of the starch. The least crystallization was observed in HHP treated wheat starch stored at 23 °C. The storage modulus increased with crystallization of starch.

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
Á. Koncz
,
L. Mészáros
,
J. Farkas
,
K. Pásztor-Huszár
,
R. Helt
, and
N. Lechner

Thermal and HHP treatments were compared. We established that the applied HHP treatments reduced the total cell count more significantly than thermal treatments. For example, the 10 min 600 MPa/10 min HHP treatment was equivalent to about 10 min thermal treatment at 70 °C. This combination of temperature and time is not used in the pasteurisation practice of the dairy industry. The various thermal treatments reduce the phosphatase enzyme activity to between one-third and one-hundredth of the original activity. The HHP treatments yielded similar results. Six hundred MPa pressure caused 10 to 70% decrease in the enzyme activity, while 700 MPa pressure led to a decrease of one log cycle.In the second year we tried to investigate the kinetics of the effect of HHP treatment. The 5, 10, 20, 40 min holding times were systematically applied in the range of 400 to 700 MPa. According to the results, 600 and 700 MPa HHP treatments effectively assured a decrease in the total cell count and the alkaline phosphatase enzyme activity. No organoleptic changes occurred.

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The effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HHP) and nisin was studied on micro-organisms in minced chicken and beef meat. Pressure in the range of 0-800 MPa and nisin (670 IU g-1) were applied for vacuum packed minced meat. In chicken meat the total viable cell count decreased by 3 log cycles as an effect of HHP at 300 MPa and by 5 log cycles in combination with nisin. The D value is 35-39 MPa for pseudomonads in minced chicken meat. In case of inoculation with L. monocytogenes, the cell count in beef meat was reduced only by pressure higher than 200 MPa (“shoulder”) with a characteristic value of D=37-38 MPa. B. cereus spores, both dormant and heat activated, were very resistant (D=800 MPa) in beef. However, the survival of pressurised spores after chilled storage (for two weeks at 4 °C) was smaller for non-heat activated spores than for heat activated spores. Efficiency of HHP combined with nisin needs further research work.

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