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Abstract  

Many investigations of scientific collaboration are based on statistical analyses of large networks constructed from bibliographic repositories. These investigations often rely on a wealth of bibliographic data, but very little or no other information about the individuals in the network, and thus, fail to illustrate the broader social and academic landscape in which collaboration takes place. In this article, we perform an in-depth longitudinal analysis of a relatively small network of scientific collaboration (N = 291) constructed from the bibliographic record of a research centerin the development and application of wireless and sensor network technologies. We perform a preliminary analysis of selected structural properties of the network, computing its range, configuration and topology. We then support our preliminary statistical analysis with an in-depth temporal investigation of the assortative mixing of selected node characteristics, unveiling the researchers’ propensity to collaborate preferentially with others with a similar academic profile. Our qualitative analysis of mixing patterns offers clues as to the nature of the scientific community being modeled in relation to its organizational, disciplinary, institutional, and international arrangements of collaboration.

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direction, and uncover the role of two fundamental mechanisms of tie creation in collaboration networks: homophily (Lazarsfeld and Merton 1954 , McPherson et al. 2001 ) and focus constraint (Feld 1981 ). We examine whether scientists adhere to a principle

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Kandel, D. B. (1978): Homophily, Selection and Socialization in Adolescent Friendships. American Journal of Sociology , 84(2): 427-436. Homophily, Selection and Socialization in Adolescent Friendships

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, Margolis R, Verdery AM. Siblings, friends, course-mates, club-mates. How adolescent health behavior homophily varies by race, class, gender, and health status. Soc Sci Med. 2015; 125: 32

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Governance 1998 McPherson, M. - Smith-Lovin, L. - Cook, J. M. (2001): Birds of a Feather: Homophily in Social Networks. Annual

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2007 98 339 359 McPherson, M., Smith-Lovin, L. and Cook, J. M. (2001): Birds of a feather: Homophily in

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. McPherson, M. – Smith-Lovin, L. – Cook, J. M. (2001): Birds of a Feather: Homophily in Social Networks. Annual Review of Sociology Vol. 27, No. 1, 415-444. Ménard, C. J. (2000): Institutions, Contracts and Organisations

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of these statistics is much smaller for Q G than for Q L , implying that most nodes mostly form bridges for nodes from their own group. If homophily (McPherson et al. 2001 ) occurs in a network (i.e., nodes prefer to link to nodes from the same

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.01.023 Lamkin , J. , Campbell , W. K. , Van Dellen , M. R. & Miller , J. D. ( 2015 ). An exploration of the correlates of grandiose and vulnerable narcissism in romantic relationships: Homophily, partner characteristics, and dyadic adjustment

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375 McPherson, M., Smith-Lovin, L. , & Cook, J. M. (2001). Birds of a feather: Homophily in social networks. Annual Review of Sociology , 27 , 415

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