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In this paper a short summary is given of the history of research into Karaim/Karaite religious music up to this day, and possible new horizons for future investigations are outlined. It is argued that a related field of research, namely lingustics, with its recent input into Karaite grammatical thought can help open new possibilities for musicological research, too. Two main figures of Karaite intellectuals from the Near East in the early 11th century, ʿAbū Yaʿqūb Yūsuf ibn Nūh and ʿAbū al-Faraj Hārūn ibn Faraj, are introduced. Their treatises on the Bible and its Hebrew language, together with other works of their followers, as discovered in the Firkovich collections from St. Petersburg, represent the Karaite way of theoretical thought on these subjects, including the way of reading (chanting) the Bible with the help of Masoretic accents. So an investigation into mediaeval theories and their comparison to living traditions of liturgical chant of modern Karaim/Karaite communities can bring new understanding of the Karaite musical heritage and can also be instrumental in pursuing the evolution of Karaite religious identity throughout ages in different geographical areas.

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The adsorption of 90Y on various types of soil samples representing successive horizons was studied. The adsorption process can be described by a Freundlich isotherm and was influenced by the soil type and the horizons depth. Hydrogen ions did not have a significant influence on the adsorption of 90Y.

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The loess/paleosol sequence near the village of Madaras is an outstanding record of Late Quaternary paleoenvironmental and paleoclimatic changes in Hungary and the entire Carpathian Basin. The present study highlights the results of preliminary micromorphological investigations implemented on 24 samples taken from two pre-selected pedogenized horizons of the sequence. Our work yielded interesting results regarding the evolutionary history and modes of pedogenesis in the studied section.

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Instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) was employed to estimate sediment accumulations (accretion) in Louisiana in a freshwater wetland habitat four years after the application of rare earth, samarium (Sm) and dysprosium (Dy), soil horizon markers. The sediment cores used to measure accretion also were used to construct a sodium (Na) profile (Na concentration vs. depth) in three locations. Additionally, in a 6-month study INAA data were used to determine the feasibility of using Sm and Dy to estimate the direction and quantity of soil erosion particles in a salt water wetland in Georgia.

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Results of studies of Na+, K+ and Cs+ influence on the adsorption of 85Sr on soil samples of the different types of successive horizons are presented. It was proved that the adsorption isotherms in log-log coordinates are of straight-line type and may be described by the Freundlich equation. Monovalent cations influence the coverage degree of the soil surface by 85Sr (most often lowering it) in the following order K+³Na+³Cs+. The investigation of pH influence proved its essential meaning in the process. The plateau of surface coverage degree versus pH lies above pH 5.5 or 6.5 depending on the soil type. Generally, in the studied system, the size of 85Sr adsorption depends on the concentration of the isotope, pH of the solution, type of monovalent cation, and on the soil properties.

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Eperkés Hill is a thoroughly studied classic exposure, yet its facies interpretation is still debated. The issue is whether Upper Triassic - lowermost Jurassic carbonates are regular beds or blocks embedded within the Kimmeridgian-Berriasian limestone. The answer to this question is important for the interpretation of the structural evolution and paleogeography of the Transdanubian Range area at the Jurassic-Cretaceous boundary; we decided therefore to contribute to the solution by applying paleomagnetism to the problem.  We tested several regular beds and suspected olistoliths from two artificial exposures. In order to check the consistency of the paleomagnetic signal on site level, we drilled three or more cores from each, and subjected them to standard paleomagnetic laboratory processing and evaluation.  We found that magnetic parameters were distinctly different for "regular" beds and for suspected olistoliths, but that the paleomagnetic signal was consistent within every site. However, between-site consistency was extremely high for regular beds, but was non-existent for the "megabreccia" horizon. Thus, our results confirm that older limestone was moved and re-deposited during the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous, indicating geodynamic conditions similar to those in the Northern Calcareous Alps.

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The intraformational paleosol and calcareous muddy cavity fills interbedded in the travertine of the Vár-hegy (Castle Hill) in Budapest were analyzed for carbon and oxygen isotope compositions and compared with the isotope compositions of the host travertine. Microscopic investigations of these layers indicate mechanical reworking of the travertine and mixing with the allothigenic siliciclastic material. Micromorphological features, e.g. needle-fiber calcite, carbonate hypocoatings around pores, ferruginous precipitations and clay infillings in the paleosol and cavity fills indicate that in situ pedogenic processes were active in both layers. The presence of ferrihydrite in the A horizon of the paleosol also supports pedogenic alteration. The stable carbon and oxygen isotope compositions of bulk carbonate of paleosol and cavity fills (d13C= -0.6 to 2.1‰ and d 18O= -16.7 to -12.9‰) are very close to the compositions of the host travertine (d 13C=1.1 to 2.1‰ and d 18O = -17.7 to -13.7‰,) and differ from the probable isotope composition of pedogenic carbonate (d 13C values around -11‰). These results indicate that the studied paleosol and cavity fills have only minor pedogenic component (authigenic carbonate content up to 20%); thus the paleosol represents a weakly developed soil, mostly composed of travertine clasts and allothigenic siliciclastic material.

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of the motif of the pearl 21 , in both the lyric and prose works of the period, as well as on the aesthetic horizons associated with it, undertakes to present that kind of attitude which probably can best be identified with an intellectual behavior

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István Monok . The Cultural Horizon of Aristocrats in the Hungarian Kingdom. Their Libraries and Erudition in the 16th and 17th Centuries . Wien : Praesens Verlag ( 2019 ). 390 S ( Verflechtungen und Interferenzen. Studien zu den Literaturen

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Abstract  

The story of the Romanticism sub-series of the Comparative History of Literatures in European Languages illustrates the need for collaborative team efforts such as have actually been promoted by the International Comparative Literature Association to cope more adequately with the complexities of transnational cultural constellations over time. From its inception, the Romanticism sub-series has exhibited a spirit of pragmatic engagement, a will to proceed from concrete examples of literary works and cultural discourses, rather than to impose supposed norms based on pre-agreed paradigms or to privilege today’s theorizing over the past. The cooperation among some 100 researchers from some two dozen countries has yielded an intellectually open picture of how a multifaceted heritage gathers momentum and is blended into the flow of a larger cultural poly-system.

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