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Adapa, S., Dingeldein, H., Schmidt, K.A. & Herald, T.J. (2000): Rheological properties of ice cream mixes and frozen ice creams containing fat and fat replacers. J. Dairy Sci., 83, 2224

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.M. , Rombaldi , C.V. & Chaves , F.C. ( 2017 ): Probiotic butiá (Butia odorata) ice cream: development, characterization, stability of bioactive compounds, and viability of Bifidobacterium lactis during storage . LWT –Food Sci. Technol. , 75 , 379 – 385

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during ice storage. ASEAN Fd J ., 10 , 125–127. Cohen D.L. Black tiger shrimp (Penaeus monodon) quality changes during ice storage ASEAN Fd J

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Abstract  

Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) is applied to analyse the process of ice melting. Experimental results were compared to those obtained by a numerical simulation in which a conventional enthalpy formulation was applied. The effects of various parameters on the kinetics of transformations and therefore the shape of curves has been analysed and the importance of temperature gradients inside the sample evaluated.

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implications of ice storms on forests in the southern United States. Forest Ecol. Manag. 186: 99–123. Zeide B. Impacts and management implications of ice storms on forests in the

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The concentrations of 14 elements, including Ir, Au, Co, Cr, Fe, Sr, Rb, K, Ta, Zn, Sb, Ba, Sc and Se, in the Wuxi fallen ice were determined by neutron activation analysis. The experimental results show that the relative concentration ratios of Ir/Co, Ir/Cr and Ir/Sc etc. in the ice water (0.0069, 0.00024 and 0.11, respectively) are quite close to those of Type C1 chondrite (0.0102, 0.00021 and 0.092, respectively), which implies that the fallen ice might be a piece of extraterrestrial substance.

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Sodium and chlorine measurements were made by instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) on stratigraphically dated ice core samples from Byrd Station, Antarctica, for the last three centuries. The time period between 1969 and 1989 showed an enhanced impact on the Antarctic ice sheets from oceans in the form of marine aerosols. A disturbed ocean-atmosphere interface due to El Niño Southern Oscillation (ENSO) events seems to be a candidate for this observation in Antarctica.

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Neutron radiography (NR) and computed tomography (NCT) are important non-destructive testing tools which determine information about an object’s interior structure and material properties. Although water quantification using 2-D neutron imaging has been applied to fuel cells for over a decade, the development of an accurate 3-D method has only recently been demonstrated. The 3-D water quantification technique developed at the Pennsylvania State University’s Radiation Science and Engineering Center has been applied to the quantification of both liquid and ice phase water. Quantification results of water and ice inside a known small channel test object were accurate to within 2%. This capability allows the quantification of ice within a fuel cell flow field under cold-start conditions.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: M. Koyama, J. Takada, K. Kamiyama, N. Fujii, J. Inoue, K. Issiki, and E. Nakayama

Abstract  

In order minimize the possible contamination during storing and pre-treatment of such pure samples as ice and snow collected in Antarctica, trace elements in experimental tools such as bottles, beakers, tubings and filters were determined by neutron activation analysis. By using well certified tools, ice and snow samples from Antarctica and high mountains in China and in Japan were analyzed. Relative concentrations of volatile elements such as Zn, Cd, As, Sb or Ag to Al or Fe which are major components in the earth crust were found to be 10 to 1000 times higher than in the ordinary soil for the samples from Antarctica and Mt. Naimonanyi in China.

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An ice-core of 4 m length was drilled at the Jungfraujoch. It was divided into 18 sections and analyzed for solid and dissolved material by neutron activation analysis using nondestructive counting as well as chemical group separations. The solid material was identified as stone dust. Part of the dissolved material seems to originate from dissolved limestone, whereas many elements can not be accounted for by this hypothesis and must be due to atmospheric fallout.

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