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Scientometrics
Authors: J. A. García, Rosa Rodriguez-Sánchez, J. Fdez-Valdivia, and J. Martinez-Baena

journal occupies for that subject category. They can play an important role in performance-based funding of public research. For instance, using the ISI impact factor to represent the journal ranking score (Garfield 2006 ), quartile rankings are

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accorded to the journal in which it appears as well as how often it was cited. The analysis of the prestige distribution can be concerned with only one dimension, e.g., the ISI Impact Factor. Nevertheless, the ISI Impact Factor does not capture every single

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ranking scientific journals (Garfield 2006 ; Leydesdorff 2009 ; Mingers 2009 ). The goal of this paper is to analyse some of the major Manufacturing journals from the point of view of four bibliometric indicators, respectively the ISI impact

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Abstract  

A method is presented to display the comparative impact of scientific publications relative to their environment (e.g., journals). Furthermore, the method gives a new approach to the establishment of a journal's impact as measured by received citations. Moreover, in this impact measurement a differentiation between various types of publications (editorials and letters, normal papers, reviews, etc.) can be made. It is argued that the method presented is more useful for library and research evaluation policies than the ISI impact factor.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Johan Bollen, Marko A. Rodriquez, and Herbert Van de Sompel

Summary  

The status of an actor in a social context is commonly defined in terms of two factors: the total number of endorsements the actor receives from other actors and the prestige of the endorsing actors. These two factors indicate the distinction between popularity and expert appreciation of the actor, respectively. We refer to the former as popularity and to the latter as prestige. These notions of popularity and prestige also apply to the domain of scholarly assessment. The ISI Impact Factor (ISI IF) is defined as the mean number of citations a journal receives over a 2 year period. By merely counting the amount of citations and disregarding the prestige of the citing journals, the ISI IF is a metric of popularity, not of prestige. We demonstrate how a weighted version of the popular PageRank algorithm can be used to obtain a metric that reflects prestige. We contrast the rankings of journals according to their ISI IF and their Weighted PageRank, and we provide an analysis that reveals both significant overlaps and differences. Furthermore, we introduce the Y-factor which is a simple combination of both the ISI IF and the weighted PageRank, and find that the resulting journal rankings correspond well to a general understanding of journal status.

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of 7 and an individual ISI impact factor of ~10. Relevant publications 1. Origin and stability of dipolar response in a family of tetragonal tungsten bronze relaxors; Andrei Rotaru, Donna C

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). Most notably, the ranking of scientific journals according to their citation impact proved an everlasting story. It is not only the most commonly used ISI Impact Factor as such that is in dispute; also the general question of how journal performance and

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Scientometrics
Authors: Xingjian Liu, F. Benjamin Zhan, Song Hong, Beibei Niu, and Yaolin Liu

research articles. Earthquake articles had on average drawn more citations than Journals’ ISI impact factors, despite the fact that the latter are computed within a 2-year window. Still, this could suggest that earthquake researches have performed well in

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the citation counting of the publication; this window is at least 4 years (for the ISI impact factor the window is only 2 years); – If the publication is a review, a letter of a normal paper, the JCS values are calculated for only review, letters or

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impact factor) (Garfield 2006 ), has been the dominant measure for ranking a journal's impact, which is used by research institutions, policy makers, and journal editors alike. Even though most evaluators stick to some form of the traditional

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