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Abstract

Iberian lynx distribution is currently restricted to the south of the Iberian Peninsula. Nevertheless, there is evidence of the presence of several small groups in the peninsular centre that have been forgotten by management and conservation actions. In this research, we gathered evidences of Iberian lynx presence along 21 transects located in the southwest of the Madrid province. In these transects lynx DNA was identified in 47 scats, which scientifically proves the presence of the species in that location. Using these locations (presence-only data) we built a maximum entropy model (MaxEnt) to estimate the suitability of the study area for the species. Our results show the existence of an almost continuous area that is approximately 744 km2 that is suitable for the Iberian lynx. Seventy-eight percent of this area is within the Natura 2000 network and, therefore, it falls under regulations to preserve and restore habitat types, flora and fauna. This study shows the suitability of this territory has for the Iberian lynx.

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Abstract  

Paper presented at the conference 'Literary Histories and the Development of Identities' sponsored by the Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada involving members of the I.C.L.A. Coordinating Committee at Queen's University, Canada, in the Fall of 2001.

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The aim of this paper is to bring into discussion some data concerning early Christian inscriptions from the Iberian Peninsula on the differentiation of Vulgar Latin, focusing on the several methods and procedures of collecting data (in corpora and databases), and the interpretation as regards Latin dialectology. The low number of specific dialectal traits in early Christian funerary epigraphy contrasts with specific local features that can be found when we put the epigraphic texts into their social and cultural context. We may conclude that Latin dialectal evidence in Late Antiquity should be evaluated according to its context. We can understand both common and specific traits of the written language from this perspective.

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Community Ecology
Authors: J. Madrigal-González, J. García-Rodríguez, A. Puerto-Martín, B. Fernández-Santos, and P. Alonso-Rojo

migration pathways of maritime pines ( Pinus pinaster Aiton) in the Iberian Peninsula. Theor. Appl. Gent. 100: 89–95. Gil L. Genetic variation and migration pathways of maritime

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This paper discusses the writing system of the Sephardic Jews, who were expelled from the Iberian peninsula in 1492. After a short description of the history of the Spanish Jews, the Jewish languages are described in general, then the Judeo-Spanish language in particular. In connection with the writing system of the language under discussion, a detailed description is provided of the varieties that use Hebrew characters when writing in Spanish, followed by an account of the systems that came into existence following the introduction of the writing system based on Latin letters. Related to the orthography of the Judeo-Spanish language, the pros and cons of the writing system using diacritics and the “ Aki Yerushalayim system” are discussed. Issues such as the maintenance of the language and its standardization are also touched upon.

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The first part of the paper deals with the literary genre of chronica in late Antiquity and its basic characteristics, paying special attention to the chronological aspects in these works. In the second part the author Iohannes Biclarensis is introduced. He lived in the 6th and 7th century in the Visigothic kingdom on the Iberian Peninsula and his only surviving work, the Chronica, is a one-of-a-kind source for the turbulent reigns of Leovigild and Reccared at the end of the 6th century AD. In the third part I focus on the significance of chronology in this opus, I present an analysis of all the dating formulas he uses and in the conclusion I demonstrate on some examples the shift in Iohannes’ perspective through the chronicle.

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Mithraic Iconography in Hispania

Reinterpretation of the Catalogue and New Findings

Acta Antiqua Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Claudina Romero Mayorga

Summary

This proposal aims to provide an update of the catalogues of findings associated with the mysteries of Mithras in Hispania produced by García y Bellido (1967) and Alvar Ezquerra (1981). A new approach to the archaeological material is needed due to the multiplicity of findings in recent decades and the overcoming of traditional theories in this field of study. We have focused on the figurative monuments, as Mithraic iconography has been considered a mere vehicle for the transmission of the eschatology of the cult.

Although three representations of tauroctony were located in the province of Baetica, the findings of Tróia and Mérida, both in Lusitania, are the most important source of materials in the territory of Hispania. Recent discoveries in Lugo, Altafulla, Cabrera de Mar, Puente Genil, San Juan de la Isla, Barbate, Mérida, along with the revision of the Museo Nacional de Arte Romano collection, have been a great contribution to the study of Mithraism in the Iberian Peninsula.

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The Pan-Hispanic oral ballad tradition provides us with precious examples of how traditional narratives - romances - many with roots in medieval times, continue to provide the communities where they are remembered with relevant commentaries on social issues. Amongst the romances most frequently collected from the modern oral tradition, both in the Iberian Peninsula and the Latin American countries, the romance of Delgadina offers us a testimony of how a recurring social problem such as incest is dealt with according to the particular view points of the communities where this and other ballads serve as a vehicle for the transmission of values. In this paper I discuss the various solutions proposed by Delgadina and other traditional ballads to this recurring social problem.

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Nowadays, the Continuously Operating Reference Station (CORS) network, combined with network RTK corrections (NRTK solution), is a widely used technique for high-accuracy positioning in real time. This “active” network realizes a reference frame and propagates it to the users. In border regions the coherence between the reference frames propagated by neighboring active networks is a critical problem. In this study the test results of post-processed and simultaneous NRTK positions at six test points located in the border region between Portugal and the Community of Andalusia, in the south west of the Iberian Peninsula, are presented. The analysis is based on two GNSS active networks present in this border region, namely RENEP (Portugal) and RAP (Community of Andalusia, Spain), a national and a local RTK network respectively, with similar characteristics. Upon comparing the post-processed position for each test point, as estimated with respect to each of the two active networks analyzed, the discrepancies found in 3D were less than 2 centimeters. The results of network-based RTK positioning were found to be successful within a 2 cm precision level in the east and north components and 4 cm for the up component. The results also confirm that the NRTK positioning accuracy is about 2 cm in horizontal and 4 cm in vertical, which can satisfy the requirement of real-time positioning users at a centimetric accuracy level, even in border regions considering extrapolated NRTK solutions.

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At the end of the 19th century, Georges Bizet’s Carmen was the most performed opera with a Spanish theme in the Iberian peninsula. It had made its breakthrough into the Spanish repertoire in the late 1880s, just as debates over the state and future of Spanish opera had intensified and were tied to emerging questions of national identity. In a period when full-length Spanish works (zarzuela grande and opera) were struggling to maintain a foothold in the repertoire, Carmen received numerous operatic productions and several adaptations into the Spanish lyric genre of the zarzuela, accelerating the process of acculturation of Bizet’s opera.The main ideologues of Spanish national opera, Felipe Pedrell, Antonio Peña y Goní and Tomás Bretón all engaged critically with Bizet’s “infamous espagnolade,” and it formed the backdrop to a wave of Spanish nationalist operas, from Bretón’s La Dolores (1895) to Manuel de Falla’s La vida breve (1905). This paper will explore the multi-faceted impact of Bizet’s Carmen in shaping the discourses of Spanish national opera, and its stylistic impact upon the new repertory of Spanish operas that were created at the turn of the 20th century.

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