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Summary

This paper aims at describing some of the main structural and functional characteristics of two subordinate patterns, namely infinitive clauses governed by verba dicendi et sentiendi (i.e. the so-called Accusativus cum Infinitivo) and participial clauses, as they occur in the Vulgate. The characteristics of the use of the Accusativus cum Infinitivo will be interpreted within the context of the uses of this structure in other Latin texts written in different periods. In particular, and in the framework of a functional-typologi- cal approach, we will investigate word-order phenomena.

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-evaluative type, according to Pinkster’s classification, or exclamatory accusative and infinitive clause. Such clauses may contain the enclitic particle - ne , attached to the first and most salient word of the sentence, ex. (25–26): Magistron’ quemquam

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procedures shows in the relatively complex cases, known as long distance binding. In the context of an infinitive clause (exemplifying Object Control) the antecedent for the D-bound/Index is either the more local PRO or the more remote subject of the main

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procedures shows in the relatively complex cases, known as long distance binding. In the context of an infinitive clause (exemplifying Object Control) the antecedent for the D-bound/Index is either the more local PRO or the more remote subject of the main

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