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Not good enough? Further comments to the wording, meaning, and the conceptualization of Internet Gaming Disorder

Commentary on: Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field (Kuss et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Elfrid Krossbakken, Ståle Pallesen, Helge Molde, Rune Aune Mentzoni and Turi Reiten Finserås

In their commentary entitled “Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field,” Kuss, Griffiths, and Pontes ( 2016 ) criticize the use of the term “Internet” in

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From Pong to Pokemon Go, catching the essence of the Internet Gaming Disorder diagnosis

Commentary on: Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field (Kuss et al.)

Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Author: Xavier Carbonell

The paper by Kuss, Griffiths, and Pontes ( 2016 ) titled “Chaos and confusion in DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder: Issues, concerns, and recommendations for clarity in the field” provides a critical account on a subject that the

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Introduction Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) was recently included as a tentative disorder in the latest (fifth) edition of the American Psychiatric Association’s (APA) Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders

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Journal of Behavioral Addictions
Authors: Alexandra Torres-Rodríguez, Mark D. Griffiths, Xavier Carbonell and Ursula Oberst

Association [APA], 2013 ); (b) scoring 71 or more on Internet Gaming Disorder Test (IGD-20 Test; Pontes, Király, Demetrovics, & Griffiths, 2014 ) adapted to Spanish population ( Fuster, Carbonell, Pontes, & Griffiths, 2016 ); (c) being aged 12–18 years; (d

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The current DSM-5 diagnosis of Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD; American Psychiatric Association [APA], 2013 ) has led to a number of issues and concerns that we highlighted in our recent paper ( Kuss, Griffiths, & Pontes, 2017 ). Experts in

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Introduction The recent inclusion of Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) in Section III (“Emerging Measures and Models”) of the fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5; American

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; Kuss, & Griffiths, 2012 ). Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) has been defined as a behavioral addiction and was included in Section III of the DSM-5 as a tentative disorder requiring further research ( American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). During

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Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders (DSM-5), which for the first time incorporated diagnostic criteria for Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD) in its appendix (Section 3) in which conditions were included that required additional research in

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). Most of them play casually, but 0.2–8.7% ( Choo et al., 2010 ; Festl, Scharkow, & Quandt, 2013 ) of the general population in different countries develop an Internet Gaming Disorder (IGD). They are preoccupied with games, feel restless, moody or sad

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The proposed condition known as Internet gaming disorder (IGD) is thought to share many of its defining criteria with gambling and substance use disorders ( American Psychiatric Association, 2013 ). At a behavioral level, engagement in

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