Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

This paper attempts to shed light on issues of trust, control, ethics and identity concerning military interpreters who use their language skills against the country or people of their own cultural heritage. It examines linguists (translators and interpreters) who worked in military intelligence and operations during the Pacific War and the occupation of Japan, and military linguists involved in the current context of the “global war on terror”. Drawing on Cronin’s notion (2002, 2006) of heteronomous and autonomous interpreting systems, this paper discusses different sourcing avenues of military linguists during and after the Pacific War: Caucasian linguists trained at US military Japanese schools as autonomous, Japanese nationals locally hired for the occupation as heteronomous, and Nisei (second-generation Japanese American) linguists as in-between. Parallels and comparisons are drawn between the ambiguous standing of those Nisei linguists and the situations of foreign-born US military interpreters and locally hired civilian interpreters in Iraq and Afghanistan. The complex and difficult challenges faced by military interpreters who utilize skills deeply rooted in their heritage against their own people or people of their cultural heritage should be visited in future discussion of government policies for recruiting, training and utilizing heritage language linguists in military settings.

Restricted access
Interventional Medicine and Applied Science
Authors:
Peethambaran Arun
,
Manojkumar Valiyaveettil
,
Lionel Biggemann
,
Yonas Alamneh
,
Yanling Wei
,
Samuel Oguntayo
,
Ying Wang
,
Joseph B. Long
, and
Madhusoodana P. Nambiar

Cerebrocerebellar hypometabolism associated with repetitive blast exposure mild traumatic brain injury in 12 Iraq war veterans with persistent post-concussive symptoms Neuroimage 54 Suppl1 S76

Restricted access

development of new weapon systems will contribute to world peace. As a matter of fact I believe that the estimated $694,000,000,000 spend on the Iraq war by the US alone by 2010 (Barnes 2009 ) could have had a better use. For example, each and every of the 31

Open access

. von and Abushov , K. , Self-Determination and Secession in International Law ( O.U.P. 2014 ). 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780198702375.001.0001 Wang , E. B. , ‘ The Iran-Iraq War Revisited: Some Reflections on the Role of International Law ’ ( 1994

Open access

 decades are not short in events that shook the global economy and increased uncertainty about running business in both developed and emerging countries. Chronologically speaking, some of these important global events are: 9/11 terror attack, Iraqi war

Restricted access