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). For the wider historical context: William O. McCagg, A History of the Habsburg Jews (Budapest: Cserépfalvi, 1992) (originally published in English in 1989). Sketchier, but with a wider scope is Nathaniel Katzburg, Chapters from Modern Jewish History

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, Ferenc 1998: A makói hagyma [Makó onions]. Makó. ZSIGMOND, Gábor 1992: Makó zsidósága a két világháború között [Jews in Makó between the two world wars]. Manuscript. BENEDYKTOWICZ, Zbigniew 2000: Portrety „obcego

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Jews of Safed . Mediterranean Language Review (MLR) Vol. 12 , pp. 18 – 40 . Geva Kleinberger, Aharon ( 2004 ): Die arabischen Stadtdialekte von Haifa in der ersten Hälfte des zwanzigsten Jahrhunderts

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Arabic in the Service of Regeneration of Jews

The Participation of Jews in Arabic Press and Journalism in the 19th and 20th Centuries

Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author: Reuven Snir

The first periodical publications carrying news written by and for Arabs appeared during the first part of the 19th century. The major developments in the field of non-governmental Arabic press occurred, however, only during the second half of that century. That was also the time when Jews started to take an active part in founding, editing, and writing for Arabic newspapers, periodicals, and professional journals in various parts of the Arab world. First it included newspapers and periodicals in Judeo-Arabic dialects and only later in standard Arabic language. The main centres of journalistic activity by Jews in the Arab world were Baghdad, Cairo, Beirut, Alexandria, Damascus and Tunis. Newspapers founded by Jews were mostly ephemeral, however, there were also periodicals that prospered for decades. There was a connection between the involvement of Arab Jews in canonical Arab culture and the development of the Arabic-Jewish press and journalism: wherever Jews tried to integrate politically, socially and culturally into society (Iraq, to a lesser extent in Egypt, Lebanon and Syria) there were always active Jewish owners of Arabic newspapers and periodicals as well as editors and journalists writing in standard literary Arabic. But wherever Jews showed no significant interest in the canonical Arabic cultural activities of their society (e.g. North Africa), only periodicals in Judeo-Arabic dialects written in Hebrew letters are to be found (in addition to newspapers in other languages). Jewish newspapers published in both Judeo-Arabic dialects and standard Arabic had generally one main aim in common: promoting modernisation of Jewish life in Arab societies and encouraging Jews to become acquainted with the achievements of Western civilisation. After the establishment of the State of Israel in 1948, there has been a sharp decline in Arabic journalism by Jews; in fact we are currently witnessing the demise of Arab-Jewish culture. A tradition that started more than fifteen hundred years ago is vanishing before our eyes.

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Jews of Eastern Europe). I recorded dozens of hours of prayer chant, complete services, and discussed aspects of life and music with prayer leaders and members of the community. I complemented the “fieldwork” with written memoires, literary works

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This paper will investigate the ethnic conditions of the Ptolemaic Fayum. Society under the Ptolemies was multi-ethnic and multicultural, and besides native Egyptians there were primarily Greeks and Jews. One of the main centres of Greek colonization was the Fayum Oasis, and a great deal of the settlers were Greek soldiers. The uniquely rich documentation from the Fayum offers valuable insight into the ethnic structure of the region. The sources reveal the culture, religion and customs of particular peoples and allow to present their political and economic situation in the state and to examine the relationships between them.

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This paper discusses the problems and state of the Samaritan diaspora situation in Antiquity. It was difficult for contemporaries to distinguish between Jews and Samaritans therefore it is more difficult to decide today whether a diaspora was Jewish or Samaritan. Even so, there are regions of the Eastern Mediterraneum where a Samaritan diaspora can be defined, though no history of any of them can be sketched.

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the Jews', Szombat (periodical of the Federation to Maintain Jewish Culture in Hungary). Budapest, August. BIBÓ, István 1991: 'The Jewish question in Hungary after 1944' [first published in Hungarian in 1948], in: Károly

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] (Budapest: Holnap Kiadó, 1991). Rita Horváth: A Magyarországi Zsidók Deportáltakat Gondozó Országos Bizottsága (DEGOB) története (The story of the Hungarian National Committee for the Care of Deported Jews), MAKOR (Magyar Zsidó

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