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Cooley . Roma Häussler , R. 1995 : Hera und Juno. Wandlungen und Beharrung einer Göttin . Stuttgart Shields , E. L. 1926 : Juno. A Study in Early Roman Religion [Smith College Classical Studies 7]. Northampton, MA Markale , J. 1971 : L

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Vengeance . In Herbert-Brown , G. : Ovid’s Fasti . Oxford, pp. 1 – 22 . Craca , C. 1996 : Virgilio: Enciclopedia Virgiliana . Vol. IV . Roma, p. 644 , s.v. saevus Feeney , D. C. 1984 : The Reconciliations of Juno . Classical Quarterly n

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impérialisme. Aspects idéologiques de la conquête romaine du monde hellénistique . Paris Guittard , C. 2004 : Les prodiges dans le livre XXVII de Tite-Live . Vita Latina 168 , pp. 15 – 29 . Haudry , J. 2002 : Juno Moneta. Aux sources de la

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A driving force in Vergil’s Aeneid is the hostility of Juno to the Trojans as they approach, and finally arrive in Italy. The epic in some ways mirrors the opposition encountered by Augustus as the new ruler of Rome. Juno’s opposition to the Trojans has its origin not only in Greek mythology, but in the history of the local peoples of Italy with whom early Romans had to contend. From the outset of the poem she becomes the personification of these opposing forces. Once the Trojans finally reach mainland Italy, she sets in motion a long war, although the one depicted in the Aeneid was not as long as the real wars Romans waged with the Latin League and with the many of the tribes of Italy, including the Veii. The reality of the wars Rome had to contend with are here compared to the relatively brief one depicted in the Aeneid, and the pacification of Juno reflects the merging of the different peoples of Rome with their subjugator.

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Juno, the goddess of marriage who is able – in her form of Lucina – to bring children to light, does not appear to be particularly “motherly” in the ancient sources. I will explain this paradox showing that both attitudes are aspects of Juno’s control over motherhood and childbirth, which can manifest itself both in a negative and in a positive way. Moreover, I will show how control over motherhood and childbirth is nothing but one of the numerous tasks which the feminea dea par excellence has to perform in order to regulate the roles of the Roman women.

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. Feeney , D. C. 1984 : The Reconciliations of Juno . The Classical Quarterly 34.1 , pp. 179 – 194 . Gerth , M. 2013 : Bildungsvorstellungen in 5. Jahrhundert n. Chr.: Macrobius, Martianus Capella und Sidonius Apollinaris . Berlin

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The Historia Augusta mentions some oracles of Juno Caelestis, the Carthaginian goddess who uttered them shortly before the reigns of Pertinax and Severus. This Juno and her prophecies were imporant to the author of the Historia Augusta mainly because they were concerned with the forthcoming death of Commodus and the coming of Pertinax and Severus.

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, J. – Price , S. 1998 : Religions of Rome . Vol. 1. Cambridge–New York Coffee , N. 2009 : Juno’s agents and the negotiations of Aeneas . In The Commerce of War: Exchange and Social Order in Latin Epic . Chicago, pp. 67 – 114 . Crawford

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Bibliography Buchheit , V. 1963 : Vergil über die Sendung Roms . Heidelberg Ehlers. W.-W. (ed.) 1980 : C. Valeri Flacci Argonauticon libri octo . Stuttgart Feeney , D. C. 1984 : The Reconciliation of Juno . Classical

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Bibliography Burkert , W. 1998 : The Orientalizing Revolution: Near Eastern Influence on Greek Culture in the Early Archaic Age . Revised edition. Cambridge, MA Johnston , P. A. 2015 : Saevae memorem Iunonis obiram . Juno, Veii, and

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