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Abstract  

The kinetics of precipitation reactions with110AgNO3 of some di (β-chlorethyl) amine derivates and hydrochlorides with esters of N-(p-aminobenzoyl)-L-aspartic acid as carriers in dimethylformamide-water mixture, were studied. The rate constants of these reactions were of the order of 10−4 1 · mol−1 · min−1. The concentrations of the corresponding hydrochloride solutions were measured by radiometric titration with110AgNO3 solution of given concentration.

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Abstract  

The molar heat capacity, Cp,m, of a complex of holmium chloride coordinated with L-aspartic acid, Ho(Asp)Cl2·6H2O, was measured from 80 to 397 K with an automated adiabatic calorimeter. The thermodynamic functions HT-H298.15 and ST-S298.15 were derived from 80 to 395 K with temperature interval of 5 K. The thermal stability of the complex was investigated by differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) and thermogravimetric (TG) technique, and the mechanism of thermal decomposing of the complex was determined based on the structure and the thermal analysis experiment.

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perchlorate coordinated with l -aspartic acid and imidazole, Er 2 (Asp) 2 (Im) 8 (ClO 4 ) 6 ·10H 2 O, which has never been reported, was synthesized and characterized. The molar heat capacity, C p,m , and thermodynamic properties of the complex were studied

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A theoretical description of the proton dissociation process of weak polyacids is given. Incorporation of conformational variability in the free energy of a polyelectrolyte system provides quantitative fitting of experimental data. In addition, it extends the validity of the theory to cases in which a cooperative order-disorder transition takes place. Biopolymers considered are: poly(L-aspartic acid), poly(L-glutamic acid), samples of poly(uronic acid) and some carboxylic derivatives of a gelling bacterial polysaccharide.

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: L. G. Puskás, L. Tiszlavicz, Zs. Rázga, L. L. Torday, T. Krenács, and J. Gy. Papp

Recent and historical evidence is consistent with the view that atherosclerosis is an infectious disease or microbial toxicosis impacted by genetics and behavior. Because small bacterial-like particles, also known as nanobacteria have been detected in kidney stones, kidney and liver cyst fluids, and can form a calcium apatite coat we posited that this agent is present in calcified human atherosclerotic plaques. Carotid and aortic atherosclerotic plaques and blood samples collected at autopsy were examined for nanobacteria-like structures by light microscopy (hematoxylin-eosin and a calcium-specific von Kossa staining), immuno-gold labeling for transmission electron microscopy (TEM) for specific nanobacterial antigens, and propagation from homogenized, filtered specimens in culture medium. Nanobacterial antigens were identified in situ by immuno-TEM in 9 of 14 plaque specimens, but none of the normal carotid or aortic tissue (5 specimens). Nanobacteria-like particles were propagated from 26 of 42 sclerotic aorta and carotid samples and were confirmed by dot immunoblot, light microscopy and TEM. [3H]L-aspartic acid was incorporated into high molecular weight compounds of demineralized particles. PCR amplification of 16S rDNA sequences from the particles was unsuccessful by traditional protocols. Identification of nanobacteria-like particles at the lesion supports, but does not by itself prove the hypothesis that these agents contribute to the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis, especially vascular calcifications.

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-Amino acids used in this study were as follows (manufacturers given in parentheses): l -aspartic acid (1), dl -glutamic acid hydrate (3), dl -arginine hydrochloride (9), dl -cysteine hydrate and hydrochloride (10), l -tyrosine (11), d -tyrosine (12), dl

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Acta Biologica Hungarica
Authors: Zoltán Kern, Miklós Kázmér, Tamás Müller, András Specziár, Alexandra Németh, and Tamás Váczi

aggregation of calcium carbonate via a l-aspartic acid inducing process . Biomaterials 25 , 3923 – 3929 . 50. Tzeng , W. N. , Chang , C. W. , Wang , C. H. , Shiao , J. C

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Acta Microbiologica et Immunologica Hungarica
Authors: Tamás Gáll, Gábor Lehoczki, Gyöngyi Gyémánt, Tamás Emri, Zsuzsa M. Szigeti, György Balla, József Balla, and István Pócsi

purchased from VWR BDH Prolabo (VWR, Radnor, PA, USA); yeast extract and FeCl 3 ·6H 2 O from Alfa Aesar (Ward Hill, MA, USA); L -aspartic acid ( L -Asp), Amberlite XAD-2, Na- L -glutamate (monosodium salt monohydrate), 3-morpholinopropane-1-sulfonic acid

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