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Abstract

We applied a set of standard bibliometric indicators to monitor the scientific state-of-arte of 500 universities worldwide and constructed a ranking on the basis of these indicators (Leiden Ranking 2010). We find a dramatic and hitherto largely underestimated language effect in the bibliometric, citation-based measurements of research performance when comparing the ranking based on all Web of Science (WoS) covered publications and on only English WoS covered publications, particularly for Germany and France.

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trends were identified. Document type and language of publication Of the 265 papers in the ESI database, most of them were articles (204; 77%), followed by reviews (42; 16%), and papers of proceedings (19; 7.2%). All of these

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Abstract  

A cross-sectional examination of the fisheries literature for 1978 was made to see how language use patterns were related to communicating research information. An analysis of 884 articles indicated that despite the dominance of English as an international communicative medium, there was a strong national language usage pattern. National language usage was not confined to local fisheries problems, but cut across issues of international importance. For most of the articles the language of publication was directly predictable from the first author's country of residence. However the mismatch between these variables for about six percent of the sample suggested the need for a detailed study of individual cases.

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Abstract  

The objective of the study was to perform a bibliometric analysis of all pentachlorophenolrelated publications in the Science Citation Index (SCI). Analyzed parameters included document type, language of publication, page count, publication output, authorship, keywords plus, publication pattern, citation and country of publication. The US produced 29% of the total single country publications where the seven major industrial countries accounted for the majority of the total production (66%). An indicator citation per publication was successfully applied in this study to evaluate the impact of number of authors, countries, and journals. The mean value of citation per publication of collaborative papers was higher than that of single country publications. In addition analysis of keywords plus in different period was applied to indicate a research trend.

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Scientometrics
Authors:
Félix de Moya-Anegón
,
Zaida Chinchilla-Rodríguez
,
Benjamín Vargas-Quesada
,
Elena Corera-Álvarez
,
Francisco Muñoz-Fernández
,
Antonio González-Molina
, and
Victor Herrero-Solana

Abstract  

Our aim is to compare the coverage of the Scopus database with that of Ulrich, to determine just how homogenous it is in the academic world. The variables taken into account were subject distribution, geographical distribution, distribution by publishers and the language of publication. The analysis of the coverage of a product of this nature should be done in relation to an accepted model, the optimal choice being Ulrich’s Directory, considered the international point of reference for the most comprehensive information on journals published throughout the world. The results described here allow us to draw a profile of Scopus in terms of its coverage by areas — geographic and thematic — and the significance of peer-review in its publications. Both these aspects are highly pragmatic considerations for information retrieval, the evaluation of research, and the design of policies for the use of scientific databases in scientific promotion.

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A bibliometric analysis was performed to assess the quantitative trend of Patent Ductus Arteriosus (PDA) treatment research, including intravenous injection of indomethacin and surgery. The documents studied were retrieved from the Science Citation Index (SCI) for the period from 1991 to 2002. The publication pattern concerning authorship, collaboration, original countries, citation frequency, document type, language of publication, distribution of journals, page count and the most frequently cited papers were performed. The results indicated that either treatment was not the recent emphasis of PDA research. The publishing countries of both treatments have also denoted that these researches were mostly done in Europe and North America. Both surgery and drug treatments had few international collaboration papers. English was the dominant language, and collaboration of two to six authors was the most popular level of co-authorship.

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Patterns of the foreign contributions published in six scientific journals on Earth Sciences published in different countries, have been studied as an approach for testing their level of internationalisation. Two of the multiple dimensions that determine the internationalisation of scientific journals are considered: the geographical distribution pattern of authors and the co-authorship linkages among them. The potential of the said journals to attract manuscripts by foreign authors and to promote international collaboration, through the publishing of co-authored papers involving or not scientists by its own country of publication, is investigated. Some other indicators on the degree of internationalisation of scientific journals, such as, language of publication, publishing institution, and national structure of editorial boards, are also considered. Finally, the geographic areas, the journal papers deal with, can be introduced as a new aspect of internationalisation. Three categories of journals clearly differentiated are identified and characterised: domestic, regional and international journals. The effect on publication and collaboration patterns, of geopolitical, cultural, economic and linguistic bonds among countries is discussed. The important role of domestic European journals on Earth Sciences is noted, as they are not only the main information source on the research carried out by local scientists whose study is focused on the geologic features of their country, but also, as an excellent vehicle of international diffusion for works by foreign scientists from developing countries. On the other hand, international collaborative articles in domestic journals constitute an indicator of the interest of the international community on the scientific studies in the publishing country.

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Abstract  

The use of the bibilometric analytical technique for examining tsunami research does not exist in the literature. The objective of the study was to perform a bibliometric analysis of all tsunami-related publications in the Science Citation Index (SCI). Analyzed parameters included document type, language of publication, publication output, authorship, publication patterns, distribution of subject category, distribution of author keywords, country of publication, most-frequently cited article, and document distribution after the Indonesia tsunami. The US and Japan produced 53% of the total output where the seven major industrial countries accounted for the majority of the total production. English was the dominant language, comprising 95% of articles. A simulation model was applied to describe the relationship between the number of authors and the number of articles, the number of journals and the number of articles, and the percentage of total articles and the number of times a certain keyword was used. Moreover the tsunami publication patterns in the first 8 months after the Indonesia tsunami occurred on 26 December 2004 indicated a high percentage of non-article publications and more documents being published in journals with higher impact factors.

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Research production in the arts and humanities

A questionnaire study of factors influencing research performance

Scientometrics
Authors:
S. Hemlin
and
M. Gustafsson

Abstract  

This study explored the main factors influencing the research production in the arts and humanities. A questionnaire was constructed to identify and assess the effects of various factors important for the productivity of the individual researcher as reflected in the number of papers and Ph.D.'s produced. First, respondents were given the opportunity to list in their own words a number of important factors influencing research productivity. Secondly, they evaluated on rating scales the importance of a number of pre-selected factors (e.g. individual characteristics, organisational features, external factors) assumed to be important for research productivity. 50% of a sample of 256 researchers in the humanities responded. Ratings were grouped to produce a number of indices and these were subject to multiple regression analyses. The main results showed that the production of papers was predicted by the number of Ph.D.'s produced and inversely related to the importance of organisational factors. The production of Ph.D.'s was dependent on the year of the Ph.D. and the position of the respondent as well as on the number of papers s/he produced. A number of conclusions were drawn: a) there was support for the academic social position effect also in the humanities; b) organisational factors apparently played a minor role in comparison to individual characteristics in the humanities than in the sciences and; c) the differences in productivity of papers were also related to gender, but not to size, area or language of publications. Implications for further studies were suggested.

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Abstract  

A bibliometric study using the lists of publications and work of 207 scientists working in Asia, Latin America and Africa was conducted. Number of authored and co-authored articles published in scientific journals and bulletins, conference papers, books, chapters of books, reports were taken into consideration to measure the total scientific output. Local vs. international production was also determined by scientific fields, geographic areas, sexe and language of publication. Co-authorship studies were also used to particularly measure the degree of collaboration and dependance of Developing Countries' (DC) scientists on foreign co-authors. An analysis of the references used (age, origins) was also made. Conclusions drawn concern the comparatively specific nature of science produces by DC's researcher. Partly given the importance of the scientific production published in local journals, the inadequacy of international databases to study Dc science is confirmed. Most of the DC scientists published in both national and international journals. They often cite their colleagues from the developed countries but their own work being less visible is seldom cited.

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