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One of the basic features of the itineraries is the presence of toponyms. In the particular case of the Christian itineraries, toponyms operate in two different levels: in the places of the biblical past that is meant to be recalled in the peregrination itself and in the places “truly” visited. This fact gives toponyms a very interesting “diversity”, not only from a cultural standpoint, but also because of all kinds of linguistic facts: phonetic, morphologic, syntactic, etc. These linguistic facts reflect the situation and evolution of late Latin, an aspect of which I am going to focus on the syntactic level.

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The purpose of this paper is to present a recently published medieval Latin grammatical text, whose manuscript location is Bibliothèque National Lat. 16670 ff 19vb-21vb, and whose edition is Cser (2000). Texts of this type occur in great numbers and great variety in the last centuries of the Middle Ages. They summarise the rules of Latin syntax, interspersed occasionally with morphological information, in twenty-odd points. First we give short and typical sections of the text with some explanatory notes. Then we give an English translation of the selected sections, finally we discuss some aspects of the text as a whole.

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HEINE, B.: Auxiliaries. Cognitive Forces and Grammaticalization . New York - Oxford 1993, 48–53. 17 HOPPER-TRAUGOTT (n. 15) 97. 18 FRUYT, M.: Grammaticalization in Latin. In BALDI, P. - CUZZOLIN, P. (eds): New Perspectives on Historical Latin Syntax

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–240. 12 PINKSTER, H.: Oxford Latin Syntax . Oxford 2015, 402. 13 The examples from Plautus’ and Terence’s plays are given in translation by H. Th. Riley. 14 PINKSTER (n. 12) 427. 15 AIKHENVALD: Evidentiality (n. 4) 111. 16 Examples 6–7 are taken from

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Colloquium on Latin Linguistics, Uppsala, June 6th-11th, 2011 . Uppsala 2015, 362-373, qui 362. 2 SPEVAK, O.: The Noun Phrase in Classical Latin Prose . Leiden-Boston 2014, 250. 3 Per uno sguardo d'insieme, si veda PINKSTER, H.: The Oxford Latin Syntax

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.: Syntax of Early Latin . 2 vols. 2. Nachdruckauflage der Ausgabe Boston 1910–1914. Hildesheim – New York 1982, I 88–100; ERNOUT, A. – THOMAS, F.: Syntaxe latine . Paris 1951, 122–126; SERBAT (n. 5) 329–402; CALBOLI, G.: Latin Syntax and Greek. In BALDI

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-1906, III 698). 6 En esto nuestros datos coinciden con los de PIERONI, S.: Deixis and Anaphora. In BALDI, Ph. - CUZZOLIN, P. (eds): New Perspectives on Historical Latin Syntax . Vol. III. Berlin 2010, 389-501, quien observa que, combinado con otros

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letters . With an English translation by F. A. WRIGHT. London 1933. 2 BAUER, B. L. M.: Word order. In BALDI, PH. - CUZZOLIN, P. (eds): New Perspectives on Historical Latin Syntax . Berlin 2009, 1, 241-316, here 288-292. 3 The English translation is

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perfect would have completely lost its potential for the expression of resultativity or for the emphasis of termination. 1 COMRIE, B.: Tense . Cambridge 1985, 9; and PINKSTER, H.: The Oxford Latin Syntax. Vol. 1: The Simple Clause . Oxford 2015, 379. 2

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forsitan , see FRUYT, M.: The Modal Adverb forsitan ʻperhapsʼ. In BALDI, P. – CUZZOLIN, P. (eds): New Perspectives on Historical Latin Syntax 4. Boston 2011, 836–837. This publication, however, does not shed much light upon the particular usage of the

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