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Priscian’s Institutiones grammaticae is a systematic exposition of Latin grammar. Among the writings of George of Trebizond (Georgius Trapezuntius, 1395–ca. 1474) there is a grammar entitled De partibus orationis ex Prisciano compendium, a grammatical catechism written in Venice in the early 1430s. The primary aim of the present paper is to analyse Trebizond’s procedure in “condensing” Priscian, and to give a comparison of the Institutiones grammaticae with the De partibus orationis ex Prisciano compendium.

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. 16/1 1991 Jensen, Kristian 2001. Elementary Latin grammars printed in the fifteenth century: Patterns of continuity and of change

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In 1539, a peculiar Latin-Hungarian (more precisely: Hungarian-Latin) grammar was published by Johannes Sylvester, dedicating the grammar (probably symbolically) to his son. Unfortunately enough, his grammar got lost in the war-stricken times of the first half of the 16th century. At the end of the 18th century, however, it was found again and then republished. Being lost, the grammar in question could not influence the grammarians of Sylvester’s age.The “discovery” of the mother tongues in Europe, the birth of a new spirituality (Reformation) and the compelling drive to translate the Bible into vernaculars were the unmistakable signs of the first linguistic revolution.The grammar actually is a contrastive analysis of Latin, Greek and a lesser degree German, Hebrew and Hungarian. What is more interesting, its deals with structure and not with single word comparisons. Sylvester was the first in Europe to articulate the basic difference between the chief European languages (Latin, [Ancient] Greek, German and the non-European Hebrew) and Hungarian revealing that Hungarian is of postpositional character; so he was the first in Europe to discover agglutination as the basic feature of Hungarian (though he was not familiar with this term). Among other things, he casually mentions the relationship of Hebrew (the “lingua sancta”) to Hungarian, as was the linguistic trend of his age.

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monstrous being that devastates the Dulichian ships and devours the sailors. 13 Then legamus can finally be explained on the grounds of Latin grammar as a potential subjunctive. The process of corruption is not difficult

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grammatical phenomena, the meaning of which has so far been restricted only to certain morphological and syntactic categories in traditional Latin grammars. I will try to show that these phenomena may have evidential and mirative extensions. I also claim that

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4 Conclusions In this paper we showed how the apparent lack of metalinguistic terminology in the Middle Ages should be re-interpreted in terms of explicit and implicit terminology. It is generally accepted that Latin grammar before Priscian

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system prevalent in Romance languages, the so-called Negative Concord system, where “two negators are counted for one.” 29 This characteristic, present in Romance languages, contrasts with the prescriptions of Classical Latin grammar, which follows the

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. According to Latin grammar qui … sit fuerit is not a simple relative clause, but a result clause using the subjunctive mood (not a simple ‘do not send a man who’, but ‘do not send such a man who’). 46 Even without this syntactical consideration the

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At first glance, indeed, it becomes immediately apparent that the whole text is written in Latin letters, and some expressions are clearly constructed in accordance with the rules of Latin grammar, but in some other elements, undeniable Greek

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fact overlooked in that paper. 8 In the traditional terminology of Latin grammar this class is called ĭ -stems, as opposed to ī -stems; in the present paper we refer to the former as heteroclitic, to the latter as i- stems. 9 Note that the second

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