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Acta Geologica Hungarica
Authors: Nadežda Krstić, Ljubinko Savić, Gordana Jovanović, and Elvira Bodor

The sea existing till the end of Oligocene was dotted with many islands in what is today the Balkan Peninsula area. At the very beginning of the Miocene this region became dry land, the Balkan Land, which was covered through time by lake systems of variable extent. During the Lower Miocene a succession of three lake systems spread not only over the Balkan Peninsula (comprising ex-Yugoslavia, NE Macedonia, SW and SE Bulgaria, and central Greece) but also over the northern parts of the Central and some of the Western Paratethys. Lacustrine environment ended shortly after the beginning of the Middle Miocene, when waters of the epicontinental Paratethys Sea covered the Balkan Land from the north. In this paper we do not consider any of the Upper Miocene and Pliocene lakes.

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126 417 446 Korpás, L. 1981: Oligocene — lower Miocene formations of the Transdanubian Central Mountains. — Annals Geol. Inst. Hung., 64, pp. 1

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Budapest 293 (Hungarian Oligocene and Lower Miocene formations). T.-n. Fodor B. Kleb 1986

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Abstract

The Mesozoic complex of Darnó Hill area in NE Hungary, according to well core documentation, is made up of two units. The upper unit, the Darnó Unit s.s., consists predominantly of blocks of ophiolitic rocks (pillow and massive basalt, gabbro) and subordinate abyssal sediments (red radiolarite and red pelagic mudstone of either Ladinian-Carnian or Bathonian-Callovian age, as well as bluish-grey, sometimes blackish siliceous shale of the latter age). The basalt is geochemically of MOR type, based on earlier evaluations. However, it comes in two types: reddish or greenish amygdaloidal pillow basalts with peperitic facies containing reddish micritic limestone inclusions, and green basalts without any sedimentary carbonate inclusion. The former type is probably Middle- Triassic, advanced rifting stage-related basalt, whereas the latter is probably of Jurassic age, corresponding to the Szarvaskõ-type basalt of the western Bükk Mountains. Pre-Miocene presence of an ultramafic sheet above the complex is indicated by serpentinite pebbles in the Lower Miocene Darnó Conglomerate.

The lower unit, corresponding to the Mónosbél Unit of the western Bükk Mountains, consists of lower slope and toe-of-slope type sediments: dark grey shale and bluish-grey siliceous shale of Jurassic age, both showing distal turbiditic character, with frequently interbedded carbonate turbidites and debris flow deposits containing cm- to dm-sized limestone and micaceous sandstone clasts. One to ten m-sized slide blocks of reddish, siliceous Triassic Bódvalenke-type limestone associated with the above-mentioned reddish, amygdaloidal basalt also occur. In one of the studied cores a block comprising evaporitic siliciclastics akin to those of the Middle Permian Szentlélek Formation and black, fossiliferous limestone similar to the Upper Permian Nagyvisnyó Limestone Formation of the Bükk Mountains, was also encountered.

A preliminary comparison with similar Triassic advanced rifting-type basalt and limestone/radiolarite of the western ophiolite zone of the Balkan Peninsula is presented (Fig. 1): the Zagorje region of NW Croatia, the Zlatibor-Zlatar Mountains of SW Serbia, and the North Pindos and Othrys Mountains, as well as Euboea Island, of Northern Greece. We propose the terms “Loggitsi Basalt” for such Triassic basalt containing peperitic facies, after the village of Loggitsion located in the central part of the Othrys Mts, and “Bódvalenke Limestone” for the transitional facies between Hallstatt Limestone and Triassic red radiolarite, after the village of Bódvalenke located in the Rudabánya Hills. The northwesternmost occurrence of both of these typical Neotethyan formations can be found in NE Hungary (Darnó Hill and Bódva Unit of Rudabánya Hills, respectively).

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Budapest (Hungarian Oligocene and Lower Miocene Formations). I. Bubics 1978 A budapesti metróépítés földtani eredményei

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, 183 p. Szentpétery, I. 1997: Sinistral lateral displacement in the Aggtelek - Rudabánya Mts (N. Hungary) based on the facies distribution of Oligocene and Lower Miocene formations. Acta Geol. Hung. , 40/3 , pp

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Central European Geology 2013 Báldi T. Oligocene and lower Miocene formations in Hungary, (in Hungarian) Akadémia Kiadó

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Varga, A., Gy. Szakmány, S. Jodblac;zsa, Z. Máthé 2001: Petrographical and geochemical of the Carboniferous sandstone pebbles of the Lower Miocene conglomerate from the Western Mecsek Mts. and Téseny Sandstone Formation

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145 150 Vass, D. 1995: The origin and disappearance of Hungarian Paleogene Basin and short-term Lower Miocene basins in Northern Hungary and Southern Slovakia. - Slovak Geol

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