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and remains famous to this day. Ludwig van Beethoven, as will be seen, has always enjoyed great homage in Zagreb, and so it is today. It is little known that the descendants of Beethoven’s friends, the owners of the famous piano factory in Vienna, that

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tinges, the articles from Muzica are proof of an almost completely depoliticized musicological agenda. At around the same time, the congress Ludwig van Beethoven was held in Berlin in December 1970; the most relevant avenues of research from the

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studies. For many authors, 2 the musical heritage of Ludwig van Beethoven is considered to be the central point of “all musical value” as he is seen as the “formulator of a distinctive musical language” especially in his symphonies, which present the

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, ed. by id. (Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1/1988), 116‒125. 13 Johann Aloys SCHLOSSER, Ludwig van Beethoven: Eine Biographie desselben, verbunden mit Urtheilen über seine Werke (Prag: Buchler, Stephanie und Schlosser, 1828), 79‒85. 14 N

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Weaknesses in performance indicated the worsening of conditions in the Sarajevo Philharmonic. 43 The District School of Music joined the celebration of Beethoven’s anniversary. 44 The Memorial Concert for the 100th Anniversary of Ludwig van Beethoven’s

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, four by Paul Wranitzky, one or two by Anton Hoffmeister, Louis Massonneau and Franz Christoph Neubauer, as well as Symphonies Nos. 1 and 2 by Ludwig van Beethoven, which were written up to 1804 when the catalog was finished. The Society was purchasing

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, as well as the compositions of the Viennese Classical composers: Joseph Haydn, Ludwig van Beethoven, and to a lesser extent the compositions of Wolfgang Amadé Mozart. Besides the compositions of Western European authors, this orchestra performed

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1 INTRODUCTION This paper will shed light on the reception of works by Ludwig van Beethoven during part of the twentieth and twenty-first centuries, and more specifically from the time of the establishment of the two biggest cultural organizations

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This paper examines a painting by the prominent Biedermeier painter Josef Danhauser, Liszt at the Piano, a unique visual document of the Romantic generation’s cultic relationship and collective memory surrounding the virtually holy predecessor, Beethoven. It demonstrates the Beethoven reverence of (1) the commissioner Conrad Graf, a piano maker, who gave an instrument to Beethoven, (2) the painter Danhauser, who took the death mask of the German composer, and (3) Liszt, who considered himself the artistic heir to Beethoven. Although it is a well-known and thoroughly researched painting, its re-examination is still worthwhile. Focusing on aspects of cultural history, the contemporary reception of the painting should be reconsidered from a synthesizing point of view utilizing the results of art historical iconography and musicology. As a kind of cultural study, the paper attempts to demonstrate the background and motives that lead to the creation of the painting. I shall place the painting in the wider context of the history of ideas which is represented by the art-religious experience Liszt and his Paris companions gained from Beethoven’s music. An evaluation of the narrower, historical background — the Beethoven cult triggered by the piano concerts given by Liszt in Vienna in 1839–1840 — will also be discussed.

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Opera is an exceedingly multiform and multilayered genre which has in its disposition as Gesamtkunstwerk not only to meet the most varied artistic demands, but which because of the great spiritual and pecuniary expenditure necessary for its production, also takes a highly exposed position in the sociocultural environment of its birth and performance. As courtly opera it served the representation and increase of dynastic glory, in the guise of the German Singspiel it strengthened bourgeois self-esteem and as rescue opera it compensated collective anxiety states. The early romantic claim of music to be considered as Kunstreligion was transferred to opera by Richard Wagner who as Ludwig van Beethoven’s self-appointed heir catapulted himself in the position of a Führer of the bourgeois society with the aim to give through his works trend-setting impulses for its further development. His adaptations of German myths exerted a dominating influence and have found a diversified following. As componists of monumental operas are primarily to be named August Bungert, Felix von Weingartner, Felix Draeseke, Max von Schillings, Cyrill Kistner and last but not least Richard Strauss.

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