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Amar, Zohar (2002): The History of the Paper Industry in al-Sham in the Middle Ages. In: Yaacov, Lev (ed.): Towns and Material Culture in the Medieval Middle East . Leiden, pp. 119–133. Arbel, Benjamin (2004): The

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Abstract  

The epistemological shift represented by postmodernism and its aftermath has liberated Medieval Studies infusing the field with energetic and controversial studies that have made the field one of the more vigorous (and interesting) in the humanities. Play, humor, relativism, indeterminacy, differential repetition (multiple copies as opposed to an original), performative mimesis, postcolonialism, gender, sexuality, and other concepts associated with postmodern sensibility configure contemporary medieval studies in radically different ways from those of earlier paradigms. These studies undertake to define “a new Middle Ages.” This is not the neomedievalism of late modernism that Umberto Eco described a few years ago. It is rather the period itself, stretching from roughly the 3rd century to the beginning of the 16th century C.E. The contemporary fascination with a period so different from our own, so radically “other,” points to a sense that, despite its alterity — or perhaps because of it — the Middle Ages have something important to tell us about ourselves and our age. It would be difficult to deny the role that popular culture — the many films, books, television shows and other mediatic phenomena — has played both in popularizing and in liberating medieval studies. Besides a flexible approach, these studies also share with popular culture a fascination with the historical context, but in ways only found in the best fiction and film go further to discover means of demonstrating what the historical artifact has to communicate to us: how, for example, it can interrogate or confirm the insights opened by new intellectual paradigms. They show that the challenge lies in finding a way to connect the mind and the world not only for the historical material, but also for the contemporary scene. This article will explore some recent examples of writing the new Middle Ages.

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The paper offers a digression into the issue of a specific group of children in the Early Middle Ages – the children of the elite in the northern region of the Carpathian Basin. By means of analysis and evaluation of the grave goods, the elements of the burial rite of children’s graves, it is possible to detect certain distinctive phenomena that show the importance of child individuals of higher social class. In terms of archaeological material, it is shown to a large extent by analogical phenomena of the burials of adult elite individuals. The phenomena manifest themselves with certain deviations due to the effect of a different social and cultural-ethnic development.

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The aim of the paper is to give an overview of the knowledge on asthma through the history of mankind. The text begins with ancient China and it is finished with the medicine of Middle Age. During this time, a lot of theories came and this appeared about the etiology and therapy of the disease. The paper is giving a short description of the changing medical views during this very long period including China, Egypt Greco-roman period, Mesopotamia, the Hebrews, the physicians of India, the pre-Columbian medicine in the America and the Arabic world, and partly the European medicine of the Middle Ages.

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The present article explores the way how medieval people thought about time and organized their lives in light of the constant passing of time. Whereas modern philosophers and historians have generally credited the Middle Ages with a radically different time concept in contrast to the modern world, here I will argue that occasionally the differences were considerably less stringent and perhaps not even existent. Often, quite naturally, the mental-historical framework was deeply influenced by the Catholic Church which perceived human life within the extremes of life and death, or of secular time and eternity. The analysis will take us from Old High German heroic epic poetry represented by the “Hildebrandslied” with its noteworthy emphasis on the many years in which the father did not see his son, to the late Middle Ages when Oswald von Wolkenstein, through his poetry, and Helene Kottannerin, through her unique diary, indicated their full awareness of the meaning of time in its measurable quality. Not every author reflected the same concept of time, and many of them simply took their readers to the timeless world of King Arthur. Other authors, however, such as the Stricker, expressed a clear idea of time almost in the modern sense of the word by way of positioning their protagonists in problematic situations when they are suddenly pressed for time and need to reach painful decisions. The article does not intend to blur the differences between the Middle Ages and our own cultural period, but it wants to deconstruct the romantic sentiment that the consciousness of time prevalent in the Middle Ages was completely different to the modern concept of time.

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Acta Physiologica Hungarica
Authors: T Abe, JP Loenneke, KC Young, VK Nahar, KM Hollaway, CD Stover, MA Ford, MA Bass, SG Owens, and M Loftin

bone mineral density (aBMD). Therefore, the purpose of this study was to examine the relationships between lumbar spine and femoral neck aBMD and muscle thickness distribution in middle-aged and older men and women. Methods Subjects Approximately 97

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places where medieval Pauline monasteries were located; furthermore, the term custos , too, is not customarily used for medieval Paulines. In the Middle Ages the monastery was referred to as either the Szentkirály or Székelyháza monastery. It is

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Bonves in dra Riva was the most important author of Milan in the late Middle Ages. His works are partly in Latin and partly in medieval Milanese volgare . The goal of the present paper is to offer a complete scheme of verbal morphology of his language.

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The results of recent research display an unequal distribution of early Bible translations in the Italian peninsula with a definite focus on Tuscany. Through the text analysis of a Florentine testimony, Corsiniano 1830 (kept at the Biblioteca Corsiniana in Rome), the present article wishes to sketch the aspects of a presumable Bible translation attitude and style of Italian scriptural texts in the Middle Ages. Diplomatic and interpretative transcriptions form the basis of the linguistic examination of the translation.

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