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Abstract  

The photocatalytic properties of MoS2 samples including nano-ball, nano-slice and bulk 2H-MoS2 were evaluated and compared with that of the anatase TiO2 using the degradation reaction of methyl orange under visible light. The catalytic behaviors of the samples were also characterized using transmission electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller (BET) surface area, ultraviolet-visible spectroscopy, and FTIR spectroscopy. The results show that the bulk MoS2 and the anatase TiO2 were almost inactive under visible light. The nano-slice presented the most positive catalytic effect because it has a wide absorption at 400–700 nm and a high BET surface area. Though the BET surface area of the nano-ball was lower than that of the nano-slice, it has an active curved basal surface and presented a catalytic activity close to that of the nano-slice. Moreover, the MoS2 nano-slice catalyst could be conveniently regenerated after filtration and drying.

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Introduction Molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) and its relative composites have been vastly used as catalysts to remove S, O and N from organic substances [ 1 – 4 ]. The nature of the active sites in MoS 2 -based catalysts was the

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. The catalytically active ( ) surface of MoS 2 is difficult to characterize experimentally and information about atomic processes on this surface is scarce. In part, this is due to the extensive reconstruction and to the creation of numerous defects on

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(Co)-promoted tetraalkylammonium thiometallates leads to structural replacement of sulfur by carbon on the edges of MoS 2 layers and to a final surface Me x Me′S 2− y C z stoichiometry (0.01 < x < 2, 0.01 < y < 0.5, 0.01 < z < 3.0) and the composition is described as the

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Precursors of unsupported NiMo and FeMo sulfide hydrodesulfurization catalysts with concentration ratiosr=Ni(Fe)/(Ni(Fe) + Mo) ranging from 0.1 to 0.3 were prepared by three methods: homogeneous sulfide precipitation (HSP), inverse HSP and coprecipitation. Differential thermal analysis was used to study the decomposition under argon, and the reduction/sulfidation under 15% H2S—H2 of the precursors and the subsequent oxidation under air of the samples obtained after these reactions. The reactivity of the solids varies as a function of the preparation method, the nature of the promoter and the concentration ratio. The degree of sulfidation of the precursor and the presence of either NH4NO3 or NH2Cl formed from group VIII metal salts and (NH4)2S may affect the thermal behaviour of samples during DTA.

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promote the reaction rate. This result revealed that the rate constant ( k ) of Co–Ni–Mo–B amorphous catalyst was much higher than that of MoS 2 [ 4 ] in the HDO of phenol when appropriate cobalt was added to the Ni–Mo–B amorphous catalyst. However

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Abstract  

A new technique of rapid heating in high-temperature thermomicroscopic analysis is suggested. The apparatus is described, the metrological features of the method and its advantages and limitations are discussed. Application of the technique to studying the behaviour of refractory Nd3S4, GaP and MoS2 compounds in the temperature range from 25 to 2500C shown.

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the sulfur atom. Upon addition of Co or Ni, the HDS and HDN activities of MoS 2 /γ-Al 2 O 3 increase substantially. Density-functional theory (DFT) calculations show that the most stable position for the promoter atom (Co or Ni) is at the edge; there

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. Effect of adding Co to MoS 2 /Al 2 O 3 upon the kinetics of the water-gas shift . Ind Eng Chem Res . 35 : 3067 – 3073 10.1021/ie950785v . 14. Lian , Y , Wang , H , Zheng , Q , Fang

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transformation of phenol on the Co–Mo–O–B amorphous catalyst prepared with proper preparation time was greater than that on the Co–Ni–Mo–B amorphous catalyst, not to mention MoS 2 . The selectivity of benzene, which was produced via the direct hydrogenolysis

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