Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 41 items for :

  • "Nagyszombat" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Adatok a magyarországi ötvösség történetéhez VI. Nagyszombat (I. rész: 15–17. század)

Addenda to the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary VI. Nagyszombat / Trnava (Part I: 15–17th centuries)

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
András Grotte

Árverési Csarnokának 1932. májusi aukciója (1932. május 28.) 1758.: Kerek doboz fedővel, ezüst. Nagyszombat, 1786. 232 gr. A 11. oldalon: Ritka nagyszombati ötvösmunka 1786-ból a cukortartónak is alkalmas kerek, fedeles doboz (1758. sz

Restricted access

This is the sixth part of a series of publications about the history of goldsmith's art in Hungary based on archival sources, registrars, citizens’ registers, guild documents, tax registers processed by cities and regions. The goldsmiths and silversmiths revealed by the above documents by name are compared with the old research literature to rectify its data on the one hand, and on the other, goldsmith's marks and objects are attributed to the particular artists. The present publication reviews the history of goldsmith's art in Nagyszombat (today Trnava, Slovakia), the first part of which – the 15–17th century – was released in Művészettörténeti Értesítő 2009/1. Now the equally rich output of the 18–19th centuries is taken stock of, together with the names of several artists. Some published art works are known from public collections, others from private owners or art dealers.

Restricted access

73 136 Hable T. 2000 Újabb leletmentés a Nagyszombat utcai amfiteátrumtól délre (Recent Rescue Excavations South of the Nagyszombat Street Amphiteater). Aquincumi Füzetek 6

Restricted access

remained predominantly Catholic even under the Ottoman occupation, were preserved for posterity. In 1995, Gábor Németh published a volume containing 90 Hungarian-language wills made by citizens from Nagyszombat (now Trnava, Slovakia) dating from the 150

Open access

The spiritual work of György Rajcsányi (1670–1734), the Jesuit teacher and moral philosopher of the Jesuit College of Nagyszombat (today Trnava, Slovakia), the Laurus tuta a fulmine seu consignatio sui in providentiam Dei, ex principiis philosophiae sanctioris potissimum desumpta (Nagyszombat 1707 and 1765) pertains to baroque Neostoic philosophy. The beginning of the eighteenth century, the so called “Indian Summer of Hungarian Stoicism” is defined by the publication of several stoical-minded works by a small group of Jesuits (János Rajcsányi, Gábor Kapi, Gergely Berzeviczi, Gergely Hidi, György Rajcsányi) acting in collaboration with the University of Nagyszombat.

György Rajcsányi professedly follows the philosophical writing of Seneca, he even refers to the first chapter of the De providentia where it talks about the natural phenomena created by God. He also cites another work of Seneca, the De vita beata, and the command found in this work, namely Deum sequere!, appears several times throughout the dissertation. The other stoic source he uses is the Handbook of Epictetus that he cites several times, too. Among the sources of the Laurus tuta there is the spiritual work of the Jesuit Alphons Antonio de Sarasa (1618–1667), working in Antwerp and Brussels. His writing, the Ars semper gaudendi, was highly popular and has been published several times, including one publication in Nagyszombat in 1676.

Restricted access

Adalékok Újlak egyházi kincseinek és privilégiumának sorsához (1528)

Contributions to our knowledge of the transfer of the church treasures and borough charter of Újlak (1528)

Művészettörténeti Értesítő
Author:
Borbála Gulyás

The significant medieval town Újlak (today: Ilok, Croatia) located in the southern part of the Kingdom of Hungary was successfully besieged by the Ottomans in 1526. However, its several church treasures (paraments, liturgical objects) together with the richly decorated borough charter of the town (1525–26, today in Vienna) were transferred to Nagyszombat (Trnava, Slovakia) and later to Vienna. The paper examines the transfer of the various objects based on inventories and letters of 1528.

Restricted access

Emlékkönyv a budapesti kir. tud. egyetem orvosi karának múltjáról és jelenéről. Budapest, 1896, 154, 264. Vincze J. (szerk.): Rectores Medici Nagyszombat–Budapest. Semmelweis Kiadó, Budapest, 2005, 56

Restricted access

The reform of the Council of Trent made great influence on the liturgical development of all Europe. That was also the fact in Hungary: in 1630 the local synod of Nagyszombat accepted the introduction of the Tridentine rite into the Hungarian Church. Nevertheless some of dioceses - existed more independently - protested against this decision and insisted on the continuation of their own medieval traditions. Among these dioceses Zagreb was the greatest “Protestant”. The cathedral itself guarded his medieval tradition till 1788. Through this largely documented processional practise of Zagreb Cathedral (ten manuscripts and one printed processional from the 14th up to the 18th centuries) one can follow the particularities of a liturgy preserved isolated: the basically remained liturgical chants were influenced by some new practise, mainly simplifications but additions as well.

Restricted access

The documents of the Esterházy and Nádasdy families kept in the Hungarian National Archives are an inexhaustible source of Hungarian culture and art history. To this group belong the three batches of sources giving an insight into the funeral ceremonies of the Esterházys in the 17th century. Sources on the burial customs of the Esterházy family began to be published in the 20th century. In the focus of interest was the battle of Vezekény against the Turks in which four young Esterházys were killed on 26 August 1652 including the head of the family, László. Art works connected to his death, such as the weapons and outfit he wore in the battle, his portrait on the catafalque and the so-called Vezekény dish ordered in commemoration of him, were put up for various historical exhibitions. Two engravings of the funeral procession of the four Esterházys killed in action and buried in Nagyszombat on 26 November 1652 and their castrum doloris are also among the important sources. Using the prints made by Mauritz Lang after Hans Rudolf Miller's drawings, art historian Péter Szabó reconstructed the funeral procession in his book entitled Végtisztesség [Last Tribute] (Budapest 1989). The Esterházy family designated several places of last repose for its members in the 17th century. At the beginning they were buried in the family crypt of the Jesuit church at Nagyszombat [today Trnava, Slovakia] built by palatine Nicholas Esterházy. At the end of the century Pál Esterházy had a crypt built in the Franciscan church at the centre of the family estate in Kismarton [today Eisenstadt, Austria]. The first of the three groups of archival sources is the description of palatine Nicholas Esterházy's funeral procession in the Hungarian and Latin languages. The aristocrat died in 1645 and was buried in Nagyszombat on 11 December. The ceremony was organized by eight directors in kinship with the family, the master of ceremonies being Ferenc Wesselényi, captain of Fülek [today Filakovo, Slovakia]. The procession included the troops and representatives of the Hungarian aristocratic families, the council of Nagyszombat, the local guilds, the teachers and students of the academy, the leaders and bodies of the Catholic Church, deputies of the counties and the marches, and the Esterházys. Various emblems were included in the procession representing Esterházy's military rank (helmet, spurs, sword, stick) and public office as palatine (mace, sword). Separate roles were assigned to the flags including the national flag and to two alter egos who represented Nicholas Esterházy the person. The second group of sources includes the funeral procession and costs of count László Esterházy in Hungarian. The procession is very similar to the palatine's: the participants were nearly the same and the funeral ceremony was also similar. However, the written source and the funeral procession reconstructed by Péter Szabó on the basis of the engraving do not tally at several points. The costs of burial were 8615 forints, a large sum in the age. The paraphernalia were mainly bought in Vienna close to Kismarton. The expenses reveal that as was customary, the family and the familiares were dressed in new clothes and the artisans were given large amounts of money. The third source is the Hungarian account of the death and burial of baron Farkas Esterházy. A lower ranked collateral of the Esterházys, Farkas died unexpectedly in Lőcse [today Levoča, Slovakia] in 1670. Owing to the danger of infection, the funeral had to be staged quickly. Since the Catholic magnate could not be buried in Lutheran Lőcse, Farkas was buried in nearby Szepeshely [today Spišska Kapitula]. The funeral was organized by a relative living in the vicinity, the widow of György Homonnai Drugeth born countess Mária Esterházy. The procession included the locally available noblemen and the representatives of the town of Lőcse. The first two funerals in Nagyszombat were monumental, representative events, while Farkas Esterházy's was far more modest. It can be concluded from the 18 surviving accounts of funeral processions that in the area of the Hungarian Kingdom there was a relatively unified custom of funeral culture modeled first of all on the burial ceremonies of the Habsburg rulers.

Restricted access

Hiador Sztripszky is known to the Hungarian scientific world as a bibliographer, as an ethnographer and as a literary historian. However, little is known about his linguistic and belletristic works. His interests for scientific work were formed in the Ferenc József University in Kolozsvár and later in the museum of this town. As a student of the Ferenc József University in Kolozsvár he spent the winter semester of 1897/98 in Lemberg (Lviv/Lwów/Lvov). Later he worked as a court interpreter of Russian, Rusyn, Slovak and Polish. Studying Hiador Sztripszky's works about Ruthenian philology I ended up in Nagyszombat (Trnava) in the Literary archive of the St. Adalbert society where his posthumous papers are kept. In this collection, which unfortunately was kept for a long time under unsatisfactory conditions resulting in the loss of many manuscripts, I found an unfinished plan of a Hungarian-Polish dictionary which he started to write in the 1920s. Being an interpreter he must have felt the practical necessity of  such a dictionary and as a philologist he fully understood that it would be a bridge between the two languages and cultures.

Restricted access