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JPC - Journal of Planar Chromatography - Modern TLC
Authors:
Pushpendra Kumar Shukla
,
Ankita Misra
,
Manish Kumar
,
Soundararajan Rajan
,
Pawan Kumar Agrawal
,
Ajay Kumar Singh Rawat
, and
Sharad Srivastava

Plant metabolite varies with season and geographic conditions. The present study is aimed at the identification of the potential chemotypes of Coleus forskohlii, available in the natural habitat of Nilgiri hills and adjoining area, in order to provide a basic lead for the industry concerning commercial exploitability, including the location-specific commercial cultivation of the plant. The effect of intra-specific variability in the forskolin content among the populations was estimated using high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC)—densitometric method. The roots of fourteen naturally occurring populations from the entire hill range were collected, covering the wide topography from foot hills up to the highest peak. The method developed for the quantification of forskolin was validated and found to be linear, specific, and accurate with precision and accuracy. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 1.04 and 3.16 ng spot−1. Precision studies (both inter-day and intra-day) were within the standard limit of relative standard deviation (RSD) (%) less than 3%. The quantification of forskolin within the population revealed that it varied from 0.0046 ± 0.0005 (NBC-36) to 1.156 ± 0.003% (NBC-46). The analysis of variance (ANOVA) suggested that there are significant differences in forskolin content among the populations. A positive correlation (Karl Pearson) was found between the altitude and the forskolin content. The cluster analysis of the population on forskolin content suspected the presence of two chemotypes. The study suggests the presence of chemotaxonomic variation among the populations which can be due to the change in phytogeographical factors.

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Frullania ramuligera , an overlooked, rare and long-lost liverwort, has been rediscovered in the southern Western Ghats in India after nearly two centuries. Till now the collection made by Perrottet during 1834–1839 in the Nilgiri Hills is the only representative of this species.

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Fissidens serratus, a long-lost liverwort, is rediscovered in the Indira Gandhi National Park in Anamalais in the Western Ghats in Peninsular India after nearly two centuries. Till now, the collection made by Perrottet between 1834 and 1839 in the Nilgiri Hills has been the only Indian representative of this species.

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Rajan, S., M. Sethuraman and P. K. Mukherjee. 2002. Ethnobiology of Nilgiri hills, India. Phytotherapy Research 16:98–116. Mukherjee P. K. Ethnobiology of Nilgiri hills, India

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Acta Botanica Hungarica
Authors:
G. K. Mishra
,
D. K. Upreti
,
S. Nayaka
,
A. Thell
,
I. Kärnefelt
,
L. Lőkös
,
J.-S. Hur
,
G. P. Sinha
, and
S. Y. Kondratyuk

. Upreti & S. Nayaka, LWG-01-75488. - Jammu & Kashmir, Doda district, Kistwar, Sarthal, Forest area, on exposed rock, 03.11.2005, R. Rana, LWG-05-006068. - Tamil Nadu, Nilgiri hills, Love date, on stones, 01.12.1973, K. P. Singh, LWG-73-510, LWG-73

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