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citations of both editions contains an overestimation” (Marx 2001 , p. 140). Marx ( 2001 ) found that the JIF for AC-IE published in the JCR for the year 1998 is too high by about 15%. In this study we take the case of the interactive open access

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Orvosi Hetilap
Authors: Éva Juhász, Éva Kührner, and Lívia Vasas

Initiative Protocol for Metadata Harvesting (e-dokumentum). (2007. október 17.) http://www.openarchives.org/OAI/openarchivesprotocol.html Bailey, C. W.: Open access bibliography: Liberating scholarly literature with

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Scientometrics
Authors: Isidro Aguillo, José Ortega, Mario Fernández, and Ana Utrilla

Abstract  

The Ranking Web of World Repositories (http://repositories.webometrics.info) is introduced. The objective is to promote Open access initiatives (OAI) supporting the use of repositories for scientific evaluation purposes. A set of metrics based on web presence, impact and usage is discussed. The Ranking is built on indicators obtained from web search engines following a model close to the Impact Factor one. The activity accounts for a 50% of the index, including number of pages, pdf files and items in Google Scholar database, while the visibility takes into account the external inlinks received by the repository (the other 50%). The Ranking provides the Top 300 repositories from a total of 592 worldwide, with a strong presence of US, German and British institutional repositories and the leadership of the large subject repositories. Results suggest the need to take into consideration other file formats and the usage information, an option is not feasible today.

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Abstract  

Scientometric predictors of research performance need to be validated by showing that they have a high correlation with the external criterion they are trying to predict. The UK Research Assessment Exercise (RAE) — together with the growing movement toward making the full-texts of research articles freely available on the web — offer a unique opportunity to test and validate a wealth of old and new scientometric predictors, through multiple regression analysis: Publications, journal impact factors, citations, co-citations, citation chronometrics (age, growth, latency to peak, decay rate), hub/authority scores, h-index, prior funding, student counts, co-authorship scores, endogamy/exogamy, textual proximity, download/co-downloads and their chronometrics, etc. can all be tested and validated jointly, discipline by discipline, against their RAE panel rankings in the forthcoming parallel panel-based and metric RAE in 2008. The weights of each predictor can be calibrated to maximize the joint correlation with the rankings. Open Access Scientometrics will provide powerful new means of navigating, evaluating, predicting and analyzing the growing Open Access database, as well as powerful incentives for making it grow faster.

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Abstract  

Open Access movement has been proven to be capable to enhance the recognition of scientific outputs by improving their visibility. However, it is not clear how different entities benefit from the Open Access advantage; because, the recognition process is dominated by some psychological or realistic biases, resulting in an unequal distribution of citations between different entities. The biases may be exacerbated in Open Access world, e.g. due to the scientists uncertainty about the quality of Open Access materials, or quantitatively or qualitatively unequal presence of countries. Consequently, although, Open Access is able to achieve their potential citations, it is not unlikely that it increases the inequalities, depriving the already “have-nots”. Trying to illuminate how countries are benefiting from Open Access advantage, this study compares citation performances of the world’s countries in two journal sets, i.e. Open Access and non Open Access journals. The results of the analyses conducted at subject field level show that overall recognition gap between developed and less-developed blocks is widened by publishing in Open Access journals. The verification of individual countries’ performances confirms the finding by revealing that open-access-advantaged nations are mainly consisted of developed ones. However, some open-access-advantaged instances are from the less-developed block, which may promisingly suggest early heralds of Open Access potentialities to achieve the recognition of “lost sciences”, leading to relative reparation of the gap in future.

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Abstract  

By their widespread availability and dissemination through open access media, scholarly outputs witness an improved visibility supposed to cause a better citation performance. However, due to the existence of the Matthew effect in science system, which affects users’ perceptions of quality, ultimate effects of the enhanced visibility on different entities are obscure. Moreover, different attitudes towards open access give rise to a more strong quality dynamics in the open access world. Aiming to explore the consequence of the interaction between visibility and quality dynamics, this study investigates countries positioning in open access journals. The results show that the world’s countries welcome open access pattern whether by submitting to or publishing open access journals. A large proportion of the enduring, prestigious open access journals are published by scientifically proficient and developing nations, emphasizing their successful commitment to maintain the undertaken role. The results of the citation analysis highlight national inequalities regarding citation distributions among countries contributing to the journals within the system and within individual disciplines in the system. Well-performing countries mainly consist of advanced ones; however, some lessdeveloped nations are found to perform well in the journal system.

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Abstract  

In Open Access (OA) environment where article-based or author-based evaluation is important, a new evaluation system is needed to accommodate characteristics of Open Access Resources (OAR) and to overcome limitations of pre-existing evaluation systems such as journal-based evaluation. Primary and secondary evaluation factors were selected. Primary factors include hits and citations that constitutes composite index. Several secondary factors each for article and author evaluation were selected for normalization of the indexes. To validate superiority of newly developed normalized composite index systems compared to the monovariable index system, time-driven bias and power of discrimination were adopted. The results led to the conclusion that composite index proved to be a more stable index offsetting the negative effects from one element to another and normalization makes the composite index even more stable by controlling the bias from external elements.

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Abstract  

Using 17 fully open access electronic journals published uninterruptedly during 2000–2004 in the field of Library and Information Science the present study investigated the trend of LIS Open Access e-journals’ literature by analysing articles, authors, institutions, countries, subjects, & references. Quantitative content analysis was carried out on the data, data were analysed in order to project literature growth, authorship pattern, gender pattern, cited references pattern and related bibliometric phenomena. The analysis indicates that there were as many as 1636 articles published during 2000–2004 with an average increment of 23.75 articles per year. The authorship pattern indicates that team research has not been very common in LIS OA publishing and male authors were keener than female authors. Authors from academic institutions were paid more interest in OA publishing and most of them were from developed nations. The subject coverage of these OA e-journals was very vast and almost all facets of information and library science were covered in these articles. There were 90.10% of articles of these e-journals contained references and on an average an article contained 24 references. Of these, 38.53% of references were hyperlinked and 87.35% of hyperlinked references were live during investigation. The analysis of data clearly indicates that OA e-journals in LIS are rapidly establishing themselves as a most viable media for scholarly communication.

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Summary  

We define the URL citations of a Web page to be the mentions of its URL in the text of other Web pages, whether hyperlinked or not. The proportions of formal and informal scholarly motivations for creating URL citations to Library and Information Science open access journal articles were identified. Five characteristics for each source of URL citations equivalent to formal citations were manually extracted and the relationship between Web and conventional citation counts at the e-journal level was examined. Results of Google searches showed that 282 research articles published in the year 2000 in 15 peer-reviewed LIS open access journals were invoked by 3,045 URL citations. Of these URL citations, 43% were created for formal scholarly reasons equivalent to traditional citations and 18% for informal scholarly reasons. Of the sources of URL citations, 82% were in English, 88% were full text papers and 58% were non-HTML documents. Of the URL citations, 60% were text URLs only and 40% were hyperlinked. About 50% of URL citations were created within one year after the publication of the cited e-article. A slight correlation was found between average numbers of URL citations and average numbers of ISI citations for the journals in 2000. Separating out the citing HTML and non-HTML documents showed that formal scholarly communication trends on the Web were mainly influenced by text URL citations from non-HTML documents.

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Abstract  

This study was survey on citation research of Open Access (OA) journals in English papers of Iranian universities journals during year 2007. The main purposes of this paper were: to examine the state of English papers in Iranian journals in Thomson Scientific Master Journal List (TSMJL); and to analyze their visibility through citations to OA journals in DOAJ database. In fact, the researcher has used of citation analysis technique of bibliometric and large-scale sociometric analyses on about 16,219 citations. The method followed in the first part of this study is obtaining data from e-journal articles which indexed in TSMJL, conducting descriptive analyses, and reporting the findings in tables and figures. In the second part of the study, DOAJ database is used to behaviour cited reference searches and other citation analyses. It found that there are 960 Iranian print-based journals and only 37 Iranian Journals was indexed in TSMJL. Sixteen English Journals in TSMJL of eight Iranian universities. Throughout sixteen journals only one journal didn’t publish during 2007 and there were 704 articles all over the fifteen journals. Using large-scale sociometric analyses on about 16,219 citations all over 15 journals, it is notable that number of journals without citation to DOAJ was 3,101 (99.7%) and the number of journals with citation to DOAJ was 9 (0.3%). It shows that there was huge difference between the journals which had citing to DOAJ and without citing to DOAJ.

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