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The god Janus is a programmatic figure in Ovid’s Fasti , having in his complexity even more than two faces. Yet a passage of the dialogue ( F . 1. 229–254) between the god and the poet has not received due attention. The main interest of this paper is to show how the tradition connecting the ship (represented on the coin) with Janus or Saturnus, respectively, is re-shaped by Ovid in order to clarify his position towards Vergil’s concurrent passage in Aeneid 8: Janus is not an immigrant as Saturnus, but an indigenous god. In addition, the difference between Vergil’s and Ovid’s attitude to the teleology of Roman history will be elucidated.

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Ovid’s representation of Orpheus is strictly related to Virgil’s texts. A wide range of studies have proved so far that the 10 th book of Metamorphoses follows the Georgics as far as narrative structure and use of vocabulary are concerned. Nevertheless it has been omitted, that Ovid’s work contains a number of patterns derived not from the Georgics but the Eclogues . Important textual parallelisms — such as Orpheus as being the representative of the elegy in contrast to epic, recusatio, the descent into the nether world, the motif of mourning nature, Hyacinthus, Adonis et Eurydice, the problem of a poet’s immortality, the mourning nature — attest that both Virgil’s and Ovid’s view of Orpheus is rooted in Epitaphios Bionos consequently this work is one of the most significant literary sources of both texts.

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In this paper I argue that the subtext for Ovid's positive portrayal of Diomedes at Rem. 151-167 is the Vergilian episode of Diomedes' reply to the embassy of the Latins (Aen. 11.252-93), and that the adjustment of this episode to the frame of Ovid's erotic didactic is achieved through a number of similarities in diction and theme. Ovid's treatment of the Vergilian Diomedes, however, is subversive and the Vergilian narrative is being undermined and reworked in a brand new way.

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, M. H. 1974 : Roman Republican Coinage [ RRC ]. Cambridge Dolansky , F. 2011 : Reconsidering the Matronalia and Women’s Rites . Classical World 104.2 , pp. 191 – 209 . Fantham , E. 1986 : Ovid, Germanicus and the Composition of the

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The placement of Helenus, the Trojan seer, near the end of Pythagoras’ speech in Ovid’s Metamorphoses 15, humorously comments on the Augustan projection of Rome’s predestined world conquest. In Metamorphoses 15, the philosopher Pythagoras casts himself in the light of the Vergilian Helenus. Among the various common characteristics Helenus and Pythagoras share outstanding is their metaliterary identity as conveyed in an interfusion of comprehensive knowledge, communication of uncontested truth but also adherence to deception: the Ovidian Pythagoras’ speech is ridden with inaccurate information and chronological fallacies, while Ovid’s Helenus is in fact the Vergilian Helenus, a confused individual who lives in the deceptive contentment of an a-chronic world of ghosts. By means of undermining the infallibility of prophesying through the lack of credibility of the prophet, Ovid undermines the standardization of the literary motif of epic prophecies about Rome’s world conquest, a much advertized theme in the various expressions of Augustan ideology of global conquest.

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The translations of Maximos Planudes are curiosities of the Byzantine literature. Apart from their high literary quality, the works of the Byzantine philologist-monk represented the complete material of the medieval Latin trivium and quadrivium: the dialogue Somnium Scipionis of Cicero together with the commentary of Macrobius, the Consolatio Philosophiae of Boethius, the Dicta Catonis as well as the Heroides and Metamorphoses of Ovid. The theme of this paper is the translation of the Heroides and its reception in the Byzantine world and later in Western Europe during the humanism. The final conclusion is that the letters of Ovid were adapted to the Byzantine curriculum and used as sample texts in the progymnasmata -method.

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According to the official propaganda Aeneas was one of the most important figures in the mythical-historical past of Rome. However, we hardly meet his figure in the Fasti : he is usually presented as rescuing the gods of Troy, the Penates. As opposed to Aeneas, the Arcadian Euander is presented with the function of even replacing him in many respects. Euander, as Aeneas, appears in few stories, nevertheless, his figure is characterised with such sympathy and the foundation of such significant cults is attributed to him that he becomes superior to Aeneas in the text. Numa Pompilius emerges as an alternative to Romulus in the Fasti . Augustus intended to represent the values symbolised by both Romulus and Numa, however, in the Fasti , his figure is rather connected with the poet and with the ideal ruler of his imagination than with the princeps personally. It is striking that although Augustus tried to present also Numa as his forerunner, we cannot find this idea in the Fasti .

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Daedalus in the Metamorphoses may be interpreted as one of Ovid's typical artist figures, like Pygmalion or Arachne. A detailed comparative analysis of Ovid's two Daedalus-Icarus episodes, and similarly the structure of Met. VIII 183-259 go to show that here is Icarus in the limelight as an artist-allegory, serving to express the poet's view on poetry and his own role in it. His winged artist refuses the Horatian middle course and approaches to the winged soul of Plato's Phaedrus, representing at the same time the tragical impossibility of its attempt.

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Summary

Adonis presents a special case of Romans' wide interest in Eastern religions during the Augustan age: he was brought to Rome by poets, and for this reason his ‘existence’ in Latin culture was exclusively literary. His worship never had the same importance as in Hellenistic Egypt, but the pathos of this figure, and his story of love and death aroused the interest of the elegiac poets, in particular, who used his exemplum to illustrate certain τόποι of their genre and to emphasize the originality of their poetry. Through the analysis of his treatment in Propertius and in Ovid a series of reflections on elegy's nature and sense can be reconstructed in an interesting dialogue between the two poets.

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