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Abstract  

The paper presents the results of studies of phosphate anion sorption on various types of soil taken up from the Lublin Province (Poland). Anions belong to the group of ions witch undergo insignificant sorption according to the soil science. As follows from the studies anion sorption depends insignificantly on pH. Sorption isotherms can be described using the Freundlich equation. Sorption extent depends on concentration of iron ions and organic substances in the sample. Specific sorption (chemisorptions) plays the greatest role in the process under investigation.

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Abstract  

The extraction of uranium(VI) with di-2-ethylhexyldithiophosphoric acid (HEhdtp) in benzene from aqueous solutions containing nitrate, chloride, sulfate and phosphate anions was investigated. The data obtained show hat the mechanism of extraction is similar to that established for perchlorate media. The inorganic anions present in the aqueous phase do not participate in the extraction process but affect the magnitude of the distribution ratio by the complexation phenomena which occur in the aqueous phase. In benzene the extracted species is a 12 complex of uranium(VI) with HEhdtp.

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Abstract  

Immobilization of lead contamination in soils by precipitation of non-assimilable for plants Pb-phosphate was considered. Glassy fertilizer of controlled release rate of the nutrients for plants as a source of phosphate anions was applied. Thermal analysis methods (TG/DTG/DTA) were used for the identification of components of Pb-precipitate, which being in statu nascendi have nonstoichiometric composition and disordered crystallographic structure difficult to identify by XRD method. Application of TA methods permits to demonstrate the negative role of Pb complexing citric acid solution simulating the natural soil conditions, which inhibits the Pb-phosphate of pyromorphite type formation.

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Abstract

Thermogravimetry combined with evolved gas mass spectrometry has been used to characterise the mineral ardealite and to ascertain the thermal stability of this ‘cave’ mineral. The mineral ardealite Ca2(HPO4)(SO4)·4H2O is formed through the reaction of calcite with bat guano. The mineral shows disorder, and the composition varies depending on the origin of the mineral. Thermal analysis shows that the mineral starts to decompose over the temperature range of 100–150 °C with some loss of water. The critical temperature for water loss is around 215 °C, and above this temperature, the mineral structure is altered. It is concluded that the mineral starts to decompose at 125 °C, with all waters of hydration being lost after 226 °C. Some loss of sulphate occurs over a broad temperature range centred upon 565 °C. The final decomposition temperature is 823 °C with loss of the sulphate and phosphate anions.

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Abstract  

Hydrotalcites of formula Mg6A12(OH)16(PO4)�4H2O formed by intercalation with the phosphate anion as a function of pH show variation in the d-spacing attributed to the size of the hydrated anion in the interlayer. The value changes from 11.91 � for pH 9.3, to 7.88 � at pH 12.5. No crystalline hydrotalcites with phosphate in the interlayer were formed at pH 9.3. Thermal decomposition identifies three steps namely dehydration, dehydroxylation and some loss of carbonate during the thermal treatment. The addition of a thermally activated ZnAl-HT to a phosphate solution resulted in the uptake of the phosphate and the reformation of the hydrotalcite. The technology has the potential for water purification through anion removal.

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: J. Soriano-Rodríguez, V. Badillo-Almaraz, C. Alliot, F. Monroy-Guzmán, and P. Vitorge

Abstract  

The sorption of Pd(II) on hydroxyapatite (Ca10(PO4)6(OH)2) has been studied at 25 °C as a function of pH, in 0.01 M NaClO4, and 0.01 and 0.025 M Ca(ClO4)2 aqueous background electrolytes and Pd(II) concentration (9.3 to 47 μM), trying to minimize some types of reactions, such as solid dissolution of and metal precipitation. The radiotracer palladium, 109Pd, obtained by neutron irradiation, has been used to calculate the palladium’s distribution coefficients K d between aqueous and solid phase. A mathematical treatment of results has been made by ion-exchange theory in order to interpret palladium sorption onto treated solid. For this, we take into account the existence of active sites at the hydroxyapatite surface, and the aqueous solution chemistry of palladium as well as the effect of phosphate anions from solid dissolution. The results can be explained as evidence of sorption of the species PdOH+, and of a mixed hydroxo complex of Pd2+ like (XCaO)–PdOH+·nH2O fixed onto {≡Ca–OH} surface sites of the hydroxyapatite.

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studies, we reported the synthesis and characterization of nickel(0) nanoclusters stabilized electrostatically by hydrogen phosphate anion (HPO 4 2− ) or sterically by poly(N-viny-2-pyrrolidone) [ 10 , 11 ]. Here, we report, for the first time, the

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Thermal stability of crandallite CaAl3(PO4)2(OH)5·(H2O)

A ‘Cave’ mineral from the Jenolan Caves

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Ray L. Frost, Sara J. Palmer, and Ross E. Pogson

guano provides a source of phosphate anions. The crandallite is formed on the calcite surfaces and the calcite provides a source of the Ca 2+ ions. The Al 3+ ions come from clays in the caves. These caves are used for the dating of the cave system. The

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