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information about the photocatalyst surface after the degradation process, because it is very important to observe the color of titania material surface to be sure that all the dye was decomposed. The photocatalytic activity is usually estimated by measuring

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(TiO 2−x N x ) was reported to be successful as a visible-light-sensitive photocatalyst [ 1 ]. Nitrogen-doped Ta 2 O 5 also demonstrates photocatalytic activity to decompose organic compounds under visible-light irradiations [ 2 , 3 ]. It is

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TiO 2 , Ta 2 O 5 shows photocatalytic activity under UV light irradiation [ 4 , 5 ]; furthermore, nitrogen-doped Ta 2 O 5 decomposes gaseous iso-propanol under Vis light irradiation [ 6 ], as in the case of N-doped TiO 2 . As the degree of nitrogen

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the crystallinity of TiO 2 and the photocatalytic activity. Eremia et al. [ 6 ] suggested that the fluorescence method using terephthalic acid to observe the generation of hydroxyl radicals is rapid, efficient, and highly sensitive, and the apparatus

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area, crystalline phases and surface quality) of the catalyst nanoparticles, so that achieving the highest possible photocatalytic activity. For more details of the synthesis procedure, see our previous publication [ 9

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Abstract  

To utilize visible light more efficiently in photocatalytic reactions, Bi2O3/CaO photocatalysts were prepared by a mechanical mixing method and characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and UV–vis spectroscopy. UV–vis spectroscopy results showed that the photocatalysts have a wide absorption band in the range of visible light. The photocatalytic activities of obtained Bi2O3, CaO, and Bi2O3/CaO samples were evaluated by methylene blue degradation under visible light irradiation. It was found that the Bi2O3/CaO sample exhibited the highest photocatalytic activity.

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Reaction Kinetics, Mechanisms and Catalysis
Authors: Bo-Hyun Kim, Tae-Hee Lim, Jin-Woong Roh, Sang-Geun Lee, Chang Ju, Seong Park, Seong Hong, and Gun Lee

Abstract  

Undoped and Cr-doped Bi12TiO20 (BTO) were prepared and used as photocatalysts for the degradation of formic acid both under visible light and UV irradiation. The effects of the Cr doping on the visible light response and the photocatalytic activity of BTO were investigated. The prepared catalysts were characterized by using XRD, XPS, UV–Vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. The doping of Bi12TiO20 with low concentration of Cr leads to noticeable increase in visible light absorption and decrease in the recombination rate of photo-generated electrons and holes. As a result, the Cr-doped BTO showed a higher photocatalytic activity for the degradation of formic acid both under visible light and UV irradiation, as compared with undoped BTO.

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energy conversion [ 1 – 7 ]. Among photocatalysts, TiO 2 has received the most attention as a photocatalytic material because of its superior photocatalytic activity, chemical stability, low cost, and nontoxicity [ 8 , 9 ]. A major drawback of TiO 2 is

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advantage of not only high photocatalytic activity, but also good acid resistance, low cost, and no toxicity, which makes titanium dioxide one of the best photocatalytic agents [ 3 , 4 ]. Titania can exist as an amorphous layer and also in three

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semiconductor photocatalysts with high photocatalytic activity, nontoxic nature, stability in aqueous solution, and relatively low cost. The superior photocatalytic property of ZnO is due to its direct band gap and longer lifetime of photogenerated electrons and

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