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The nucleotide sequence of the coat protein (CP) gene and the 3' non-translated region, in relation to aphid transmission of 7 potato tuber necrotic ringspot isolates of Potato virus Y (PVYNTN) were studied. Five isolates originated from different areas of potato fields in Hungary and two German isolates served as controls. A 5' tail of the nucleotide sequences of the CP region and 3' non-translated region (NTR) were determined. Sequence data were sent to the EMBL GeneBank Database. Homology of nucleotide and amino acid sequences were high among the studied PVY isolates. According to the characteristic regions, all isolates belonged to the PVYNTN strain. All of the tested isolates could be transmitted by the aphid Myzus persicae Sulzer to the test plant Nicotiana tabacum L. verifying the wide distribution of tuber necrotic ringspot strain in Hungary. Our data suggest that the high homology found in the CP region of the different isolates, are suitable for development of coat protein mediated resistance against PVY in commercially important host plants like, e.g. potato.

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Dinant, S., Blaise, F., Kusiak, C., Asterier-Manifacier, S. and Albouy, J. (1993): Heterologous resistance to potato virus Y in transgenic tobacco plants expressing the coat protein gene of lettuce mosaic virus. Phytophatology 83, 818

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Cerovska, N., Moravec, T., Filigarova, M. and Petrzik, K.(2001): Nucleotide sequences of 5′-terminal parts of coat protein genes of various isolates of NTN strain of potato virus Y. Acta Virologica 45, 55

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Potato Res. 27 339 352 de Bokx, J. A. and Huttinga, H. (1981): Potato virus Y. CMI/AAB Descriptions of Plant Viruses, No

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Govier, D. A. and Kassanis, B. (1974): A virus induced component of plant sap needed when aphids acquire potato virus Y from purified preparations. Virology 61, 420–426. Kassanis B. A

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Acta Agronomica Hungarica
Authors: R. Ahmadvand, A. Takács, J. Taller, I. Wolf, and Z. Polgár

Barker, H. (1996): Inheritance of resistance to potato viruses Y and A in progeny obtained from potato cultivars containing gene Ry: evidence for a new gene for extreme resistance to PVA. Theor. Appl. Genet. , 93 , 710

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): Dynamics of responses in compatible potato–Potato virus Y interaction are modulated by salicylic acid . PLoS ONE 6 , e29009 . Baebler , Š. , Witek , K. , Petek , M. , Stare , K. , Tušek-Žnidarič , M. , Pompe-Novak , M. , Renaut , J

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, L. – Tóth , E. K. – Takács , A. – Horváth , J. : 2006 . Petunia species as virus hosts and characterization of Potato virus Y (PVY) strains isolated from petunias in Hungary . Acta Horticulturae . 722 : 271 – 276

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The aim of our study was to investigate the susceptibility of some Chenopodium species (Chenopodium album, C. glaucum, C. berlandieri, C. ugandae) to six viruses (Alfalfa mosaic virus, Cucumber mosaic virus, Obuda pepper virus, Potato virus Y, Sowbane mosaic virus, Zucchini yellow mosaic virus). Fourteen plants of each species were mechanically inoculated and virus susceptibility was evaluated on the basis of symptoms and back inoculation. A series of new host-virus relations were determined.

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Susceptibility of 33 Lycopersicon species and intra-specific taxa to 6 viruses such as U/246 strain of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV), Pepino mosaic virus (PepMV), Potato virus X (PVX), NTN strain of Potato virus Y (PVYNTN), Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) and Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) were studied. Inoculated plants were tested for susceptibility on the basis of symptoms, serological reactions (DAS-ELISA) and back inoculation. All tested plants were susceptible to PepMV, PVX, TMV and ToMV. However, Lycopersicon esculentum Mill. convar. parvibaccatum Lehm. var. cerasiforme (Dun.) Alef.s.l., L. peruvianum (L.) Mill. and L. hirsutum Humb. et Bonpl. were extreme resistant (immune) to PVYNTN. L. esculentum Mill. convar. infiniens Lehm. var. flammatum Lehm., L. esculentum Mill. convar. fruticosum Lehm. var. speciosum Lehm. and L. esculentum Mill. convar. infiniens Lehm. var. validum Bail. showed extreme resistance to CMV-U/246. The other 30 species and intra-specific taxa were susceptible to CMV-U/246. New compatible and incompatible host-virus relations have been reported. The extreme resistant Lycopersicon intra-specific taxa could be used as resistance sources in tomato breeding.

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