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Priscian’s Institutiones grammaticae is a systematic exposition of Latin grammar. Among the writings of George of Trebizond (Georgius Trapezuntius, 1395–ca. 1474) there is a grammar entitled De partibus orationis ex Prisciano compendium, a grammatical catechism written in Venice in the early 1430s. The primary aim of the present paper is to analyse Trebizond’s procedure in “condensing” Priscian, and to give a comparison of the Institutiones grammaticae with the De partibus orationis ex Prisciano compendium.

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The detailed treatment of the Latin supine has been neglected both in scholarly literature and in language teaching, even though it is a very ancient form that has survived in an interesting way and was used even in late Latin. The fact that the Latin supine has a parallel in Sanskrit deserves attention. In this study I demonstrate that Priscian projected the Latin usage of his own time back to classical Latin, which fact was nevertheless not detrimental to his credibility.

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is much more nuanced and multi-layered. Yet, concerning the Latin classification of PoS, Cotticelli-Kurras noted that Donatus' and Priscian's testimonies are not perfectly consistent in both regarding the order of the PoS ( i.e.,   nomen, pronomen

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terminology. The metalinguistic terms and definitions found in Priscian's Institutiones , which elaborates the Greek tradition, are taken up in the commentaries, through which we see a development of the meanings associated with these terms, such as the

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Originally, however, the grammatical tradition distinguished three types of sounds regarding the l sound, which can be read in the following excerpt from Priscian: 12 l triplicem, ut Plinio videtur, sonum habet: exilem quando geminatur secundo loco posita

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similiter et afflictum ceteraque huiusce modi . 16 Cf. e.g., < ctesia> ( CIL VIII 18667), < ptolemae> ( CIL XV 6637,3), < psy|ches> ( CIL IX 4302), < xanti> ( CIL XIII 10009,317). 17 Cf. Priscian I 43: […] in fine uero dictionis contra inuenimus

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