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Abstract  

Doxorubicin (DOX) is an anthracycline antineoplastic and one of the most potent and widely used drugs in clinical oncology. It is used in the treatment of a wide variety of cancers. The aim of this study was the direct labeling of DOX with 99mTc; its optimization, characterization and quality control of the radiolabeled DOX. Labeling efficiency was determined by paper chromatography. More than 92% labeling was obtained at pH 6–7, 10–12 μg stannous chloride and 200 μg of DOX. The stability of 99mTc–DOX was studied up to 5 h. All the experiments were performed at room temperature (25± 2 °C). The characterization of the labeling compound was performed by HPLC and electrophoresis. Electrophoresis indicates that labeled DOX has no charge and HPLC shows single specie of labeled compound.

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Abstract  

Analytical quality control is needed to ascertain the reliability of results from all types of analysis, including activation analysis. Thea priori precision has to be combined with the statistics of counting in order to reach a state of statistical control. The Analysis of Precision is used to verify the absence of unknown sources of variability and to ascertain the absence of systematic biases or calibration errors by analyzing samples or reference materials with accurately known content or actual samples by an independent method.

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Abstract  

Bioassay group of Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research at Kalpakkam carries out routine surveillance of all radiation workers at the Centre by both whole-body counting and excreta analysis for assessing internal contamination. Various quality control measures adopted and experience gained in participating in inter-laboratory comparisons is highlighted.

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Abstract  

Quality control, as applied in normal activation analysis by the simultaneous analysis of well-characterized quality control samples, blanks and sometimes duplicates, cannot fully be applied in large sample analysis. Well characterized control samples are, e.g., not available at the size of large samples. Different approaches have to be developed to monitor and to control sources of errors in this new type of chemical analysis. Some of the measured sample parameters dealing with gamma-ray and neutron attenuation can only vary between well known values of elemental constants. These parameters can much easier be determined in large sample analysis than with samples in the milligram range, thus offering an outlook for direct verification of the quality of the related correction algorithms. Some examples are given here from experience with the kg-scale neutron activation analysis at the facilities in Delft.

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Abstract  

A kit-like procedure is described for the labelling of Hippuran by exchange in a melt with carrier-free iodide-123 directly formed from the decay of123Xe. Decay and subsequent melting for 15 min at 180°C are performed in one and the same ampoule. This results in a transfer of 95% of the123I-activity into Hippuran with a residual123I-content of <1.0%. Quality control is based on thin-layer chromatography. Contaminants are discussed and a comparison is made with commercial preparations of Hippuran-131I.

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Thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is generally regarded as a common analytical technique. Everybody ‘knows’ it and it is used to some extent in almost every laboratory in the world. Unfortunately for most analysts TLC remains what it has been for many years — a rapid, simple, inexpensive, and not very precise tool. When one considers the latest technical and methodological developments, however, modern high-performance thin-layer chromatography (HPTLC), also known as planar chromatography, is a reliable and powerful analytical technique, which can be in full compliance with current good-manufacturing practice (cGMP). TLC is the method of choice when many samples must be compared, when flexibility is important, and when rapid quantitative and semi-quantitative data are needed at low cost per sample.

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, Inc. , New York , Republished in 1980 by the American Society of Quality Control, 501 pages. Székács , A. , Lauber, É. , Takács , E. & Darvas

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Abstract  

Physico-chemical characterization of99mTc-radiopharmaceuticals is presented. Limiting pH values, iso-osmotic pressure and the apparent coefficient values between two immiscible phases are determined too. A selection of radiochromatographic methods /stationary or mobile phase/ for routine quality control of99mTc radiopharmaceuticals for radiochemical purity was made. The methods chosen are simple, accurate, sufficiently sensitive and fast in operation. The mean values were determined for99mTc radiopharmaceutical distribution per organs, characteristic for the tested preparates and for radiochemical purity, as well as the time interval from injection to sacrifice of the animals.

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Abstract  

Quantitative calibration and quality control have been a major bottleneck in microanalysis due to the lack of natural-matrix CRMs certified at sample sizes compatible with those of unknown samples. In this paper, a solution is described to characterize sampling behavior for individual elements, so as to identify elements homogeneous enough at stated sample size levels in given CRMs/RMs. By using a combination of several nuclear analytical techniques, INAA-EDXRF-µPIXE, sampling behavior for individual elements can be characterized at sample size levels from grams down to pg. Natural-matrix CRMs specifically for QC of microanalysis may thus be created. Additional information in certificates of these new generation CRMs is imagined.

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Abstract  

A study was made of the thermal behavior of the starting materials, their mixtures and the resulting mebendazole tablets. The thermal curves were obtained with a Shimadzu thermobalance, model TGA-50, using an air flow of 50 mL min−1 and a heating rate of 10°C min−1 in the temperature interval 30–900°C. The reaction constant velocities for the mebendazole salt and tablets were determined isothermally, using the Arrhenius expression. The thermal stability of mebendazole tablets is lower than that of the mebendazole salt, due to the presence of starch and lactose in the composition. Analysis of the data reveals that thermogravimetry is a powerful tool in pharmaceutical technology and quality control.

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