Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 645 items for :

  • All content x
Clear All

On 1 December 2011, the Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS) at Leiden University launched the Leiden ranking 2011/2012 at http://www.leidenranking.com/ranking.aspx . The Leiden ranking 2011/2012 measures the scientific

Restricted access
Scientometrics
Authors: Isidro Aguillo, Judit Bar-Ilan, Mark Levene, and José Ortega

Abstract  

Recently there is increasing interest in university rankings. Annual rankings of world universities are published by QS for the Times Higher Education Supplement, the Shanghai Jiao Tong University, the Higher Education and Accreditation Council of Taiwan and rankings based on Web visibility by the Cybermetrics Lab at CSIC. In this paper we compare the rankings using a set of similarity measures. For the rankings that are being published for a number of years we also examine longitudinal patterns. The rankings limited to European universities are compared to the ranking of the Centre for Science and Technology Studies at Leiden University. The findings show that there are reasonable similarities between the rankings, even though each applies a different methodology. The biggest differences are between the rankings provided by the QS-Times Higher Education Supplement and the Ranking Web of the CSIC Cybermetrics Lab. The highest similarities were observed between the Taiwanese and the Leiden rankings from European universities. Overall the similarities are increased when the comparison is limited to the European universities.

Restricted access

universities refer amply to international academic rankings to stress the apparently unstoppable decline of the Italian higher education system (Tocci 2009 ; Graziosi 2010 ). Not only classifiche (lists) of universities and faculties provide a useful guide

Restricted access

Introduction Ranking higher education institutions by means of subjective or objective measures goes well with the logic of these times of global competition and continuous bench-marking. Rankings are here to stay, because they

Restricted access

Introduction The Shanghai Jiao Tong University Institute of Higher Education Academic Ranking of World Universities (ARWU) analyzes academic institutions by measuring their research performance through a carefully selected set

Restricted access

Abstract  

In this paper, we examine whether the quality of academic research can be accurately captured by a single aggregated measure such as a ranking. With Shanghai University’s Academic Ranking of World Universities as the basis for our study, we use robust principal component analysis to uncover the underlying factors measured by this ranking. Based on a sample containing the top 150 ranked universities, we find evidence that, for the majority of these institutions, the Shanghai rankings reflect not one but in fact two different and uncorrelated aspects of academic research: overall research output and top-notch researchers. Consequently, the relative weight placed upon these two factors determines to a large extent the final ranking.

Restricted access

Abstract  

Ranking of universities has lately received considerable attention. However, ranking of departments would give a higher resolution picture of the distribution of quality within each university. In this work the Hirsch (h) index of each faculty in Greek Chemistry, Chemical Engineering, Materials Science, and Physics departments was calculated using the Web of Science and the mean value was used to rank them. This ranking refers to the research performance of each department and thus is most relevant to its doctoral program. The results seem highly meaningful. If performed on a pan-European basis, such rankings could spur healthy competition and could provide a strong motive for meritocratic hiring practices. Technical difficulties and possible extension of this approach to social science and humanities departments are discussed.

Restricted access
Scientometrics
Authors: Isidro Aguillo, José Ortega, Mario Fernández, and Ana Utrilla

Abstract  

The Ranking Web of World Repositories (http://repositories.webometrics.info) is introduced. The objective is to promote Open access initiatives (OAI) supporting the use of repositories for scientific evaluation purposes. A set of metrics based on web presence, impact and usage is discussed. The Ranking is built on indicators obtained from web search engines following a model close to the Impact Factor one. The activity accounts for a 50% of the index, including number of pages, pdf files and items in Google Scholar database, while the visibility takes into account the external inlinks received by the repository (the other 50%). The Ranking provides the Top 300 repositories from a total of 592 worldwide, with a strong presence of US, German and British institutional repositories and the leadership of the large subject repositories. Results suggest the need to take into consideration other file formats and the usage information, an option is not feasible today.

Restricted access

-per-paper based rankings, but also for citations per staff rankings. The most striking result is a too low position of most German and France universities in these rankings, particularly universities with a medical school. As citations play an important role in

Open access

Introduction Where are South African universities placed in world rankings? Why are some universities included in certain rankings but not others? How does a university rise in the rankings? What factors determine ranking

Restricted access