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, such as peer review, can be prone to bias (Ball 2007 ). Bibliometrics are being used to measure research productivity in various scientific fields, including anaesthesia (Ball 2007 ; Pagel and Hudetz 2011 ). The limitations of these indices are well

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academics define that word as research productivity, measured by quantity (and perhaps quality) of publications within academic journals (Duffy et al. 2008 ). In professional sports, high levels of competition and salary have driven general managers (the

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also provides insights into the research productivity of an author, an institution, or a country in a specific field of study (e.g., Keeves et al. 2003 ). Research productivity is the totality of research performed by researchers in universities and

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the individual, particularly at the methodological level, generally focused on single performance indicators. The motives for evaluation vary, from stimulating greater research productivity, to service in selective funding, to reduction of asymmetry

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Abstract  

Earlier researchers like Turkeli, suggested that ‘the factors which determine the productivity of scientists are admittedly complex and perhaps not amenable to real scientific analysis′. The present investigation was designed with the sole purpose of confronting such a complex problem. Nearly 200 variables influencing research productivity were collected through relevant literature, analysis of biographies of great scientists, and discussion with eminent scientists. Finally, through a critical examination, 80 variables were selected for the use of Q-sort technique. The sample for the study consisted of a cross section of scientists ranging from Fellows of Indian National Science Academy to young agricultural scientists. Mailed questionnaires and personal interview methods were used for collecting data. Out of a total of 912 respondents, reply was obtained from 325. On the basis of Q-sorted data, 26 variables were selected for further analysis and they were subjected to principal component factor analysis. The results indicated eleven factors affecting research productivity of scientists. They were: persistence, resource adequacy, access to literature, initiative, intelligence, creativity, learning capability, stimulative leadership, concern for advancement, external orientation, and professional commitment.

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Scientometrics
Authors: Alireza Isfandyari-Moghaddam, Mohammad Hasanzadeh, and Zainab Ghayoori

Jahannama 2008 ). On the other hand, in higher education, this is also true and thus “research productivity often served as a major role in attaining success in academics as it is related to promotion, tenure and salary” (Bloedel 2001 and Kotrlik et al

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Summary  

The present study investigated the relationship between the use of different internet applications and research productivity, controlling for other influences on the latter. The control variables included dummies for country, discipline, gender and type of organization of the respondent; as well as variables for age, recognition, the degree of society-related and career-related motivation for research, and the size of the collaboration network. Simple variance analyses and more complex negative binomial hurdle models point to a positive relationship between internet use (for personal communication, information retrieval and information dissemination) and research productivity. However, the results should be interpreted with caution as it was not possible to test the role of the internet against other pre-internet tools which fulfil the same functions. Thus instance it may not be the use of e-mail per se, but the degree of communicating with colleagues that makes a productive scientist.

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Abstract  

The literature dedicated to the analysis of the difference in research productivity between the sexes tends to agree in indicating better performance for men. Through bibliometric examination of the entire population of research personnel working in the scientific-technological disciplines of Italian university system, this study confirms the presence of significant differences in productivity between men and women. The differences are, however, smaller than reported in a large part of the literature, confirming an ongoing tendency towards decline, and are also seen as more noticeable for quantitative performance indicators than other indicators. The gap between the sexes shows significant sectorial differences. In spite of the generally better performance of men, there are scientific sectors in which the performance of women does not prove to be inferior.

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Introduction There are two main approaches for evaluating research productivity widely applied by various countries or institutions: peer-review and bibliometric methods. Both have been criticized and both have pros and cons

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Abstract  

This manuscript provides guidance to Deans and other academic decision makers in the hiring process and dispels the validity of a widely held assumption commonly used as a decision factor in the selection process. This paper investigates: (a) whether graduates of prestigious information systems (IS) doctoral programs (graduates with high-status academic origins) are more likely to be successful in their academic careers (as measured by research productivity) than graduates of less prestigious programs, (b) whether IS faculty who are employed by esteemed universities (faculty with high-status academic affiliations) are more productive researchers than IS faculty employed by lower-status institutions, and (c) examines faculty productivity in terms of Lotka’s Law [Lotka, 1926]. The findings indicate that in the IS field, productivity does not follow a Lotka distribution. Moreover, our study also shows that academic affiliation is a significant determinant of research productivity in terms of quantity (as measured by publication counts) and quality (as measured by citation counts). Contrary to common expectations, however, the analysis shows that the status of a faculty member’s academic origin is not a significant determinant of research productivity in the field of information systems. Therefore, continued reliance on academic pedigree as a primary criterion for hiring decisions may not be justified in the IS discipline.

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