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Scientometrics
Authors: V. A. Markusova, A. N. Libkind, A. E. Varshavsly, and C. N. M. Jansz

an individual researcher's performance and its impact. The total number of authors/co-authors in our study was 17,474. Users of the SCI are familiar with the difficulty in collecting data about an author's publications when the Cyrillic alphabet is

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between research performance of a scientist, measured by the bibliometric method, and the degree of internationalization of his or her scientific activity, using co-authorship of scientific publications with foreign authors as a proxy of international

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) 2007 ). Considering the central role that research performance and its measurement plays in assessing and rewarding the role performance of scientists, it may be argued that one cannot address the issue of women's participation in science without taking

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Introduction The use of bibliometric indicators to measure research performance of researchers and research units is becoming an established practice. These indicators are starting to be routinely used as criteria for academic

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Abstract  

This paper presents a methodology to aggregate multidimensional research output. Using a tailored version of the non-parametric Data Envelopment Analysis model, we account for the large heterogeneity in research output and the individual researcher preferences by endogenously weighting the various output dimensions. The approach offers three important advantages compared to the traditional approaches: (1) flexibility in the aggregation of different research outputs into an overall evaluation score; (2) a reduction of the impact of measurement errors and a-typical observations; and (3) a correction for the influences of a wide variety of factors outside the evaluated researcher’s control. As a result, research evaluations are more effective representations of actual research performance. The methodology is illustrated on a data set of all faculty members at a large polytechnic university in Belgium. The sample includes questionnaire items on the motivation and perception of the researcher. This allows us to explore whether motivation and background characteristics (such as age, gender, retention, etc.,) of the researchers explain variations in measured research performance.

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universities was allocated solely on the basis of criteria for satisfying the resource needs of each university, and it was only beginning in 2009 that a part of state funds were assigned based on merit. In this work, we examine research performance in the hard

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informing strategic planning; and (ii) to assess research performance at individual and departmental levels, in order to optimize funding allocations. The system proposed has so far been used by six Italian universities. 2 The following section

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Abstract  

The scope of this article is to illuminate the relationship between degree of international contact and research performance among researchers in small countries. Comparisons are done between the natural, medical and social sciences, technology and the humanities. Three indicators on international contact are used: a) an index on contact frequency, b) type of conference attendance, and c) long-term research stays abroad. There is a relatively strong correlation between contact frequency and international publishing activity in all fields of learning. Researchers who were invited to present a paper by conference organizers were considerably more productive than those who gave a paper on their own initiative, and this latter group was in turn much more productive than those researchers who attended without papers. Contrary to other forms of contact, long-term research stays abroad have a very small independent effect on international publishing.

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seemingly rather small, the obtained rank-order comparisons show that the proposed new use of the measure is capable of detecting hitherto unnoticed structural characteristics of research performance, as evaluated against the science maps picturing the

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grants) maintain intensive links within their own fields of research and wide-ranging links beyond their research areas, implying that the intensity and diversity of links also affect research performance (Allen 1970 ; Bozeman and Corley 2004

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