Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 1,020 items for :

  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Cassius Dio is the author of a Roman History in 80 books, reaching back as far as Rome's origins and forward as far as the writer's own time, which is to say the reign of Alexander Severus. Apart from what we learn from a few inscriptions, we only

Restricted access

Preliminary attempts to georeference maps of early twentieth century made by the Military Geographic Institute (IGM, the Italian geodetic agency) for the city of Rome and its surroundings, reported residual errors larger than errors observed on similar maps. Previous studies carried out on one or two century older maps of the same area, showed similar or even smaller errors (Baiocchi and Lelo 2005).Six sheets of the “City of Rome and its surroundings” map in scale 1:5 000 dated 1908 have been studied. The identified errors can be referred to the different system of geodetic projection and geodetic datum or to the derivation of some details from maps at smaller scale, but in this case historic documents seem to suggest a different explanation.Parameters useful to perform the transformation of the geodetic systems used in historical maps to modern systems are not known; for this reason until now the various attempts of georeferencing maps of this type were based on collimation of points recognizable on modern cartographies such as corners of historical buildings. This method has often given unsatisfactory results; therefore it was decided to proceed by determining the parameters for the transformation of geodetic datum.The history of geodetic systems used in Italy at the beginning of the 20th century is complex and, in the past, this has led some researcher to misinterpretations. For this reason a full explanation of geodetic systems used in Italy in this period is reported below. Since the parameters of the projection used for the maps in our case study are not known for sure, the reprojection was considered the only way for a correct georeferencing.

Restricted access

further. Although Alexander certainly is not at the center of Livy's work, when he considers the great conqueror a theme emerges. Livy respected Alexander as a warrior, but he contested the greatness of Alexander in favor of Rome. This article investigates

Restricted access

Franz Liszt’s residency in Rome (1861–1869) was a period not only of important premières of his works, but also of a new compositional emphasis on sacred music. Further, one can observe drastic changes in both the private and public persona of Liszt

Restricted access

The consequences of Crassus’ invasion of Mesopotamia in 54–53 BCE were unanticipated and unintended; however, his disastrous failure shocked the Roman world and suddenly established the Parthians as a serious rival to Rome. Moreover, the shame the Romans felt after the Battle of Carrhae was considerable. The battle scarred the Roman psyche and severely damaged the Roman ego. This study synthesizes and investigates what became a vicious and virulent Roman literary tradition of anti-Crassus propaganda, examining how numerous Roman writers over the course of numerous centuries used the dead and disgraced Crassus as a convenient scapegoat to help explain Rome’s failure to dominate the East and subdue the Parthian rival. It demonstrates that these writers ignored the legitimate causes for the First Romano-Parthian War (56 BCE – 1 CE), which Crassus had inherited, and illustrates that the disaster at Carrhae became a popular moralizing lesson about the consequences of greed, impiety, and hubris.

Restricted access

In order to understand any process of cultural appropriation, one needs to examine the relationship of concepts such as Lefevere's “image”, Snell-Hornby's “norm”, Bourdieu's “habitus” as well as “tertium comparationis”. Broader application of discussions within Translation Studies proves essential for understanding a key aspect of Cultural Studies. Case in point here is the appropriation of classical Rome in post-1945 German-language literature. The Rome that appears in contemporary fiction is neither the city proper nor the historical empire per se, but rather Rome as an invention. It is a cultural concept construed historically without itself being necessarily historical. It enables the process of cultural appropriation by providing basic characteristics accepted by the appropriating culture, and whose presence ensures the impression of fidelity to the appropriated culture. The invariant here is artificial. Although the image operates on something close to an unconscious level (black box), it is nonetheless discernable because it manifests itself in the context, choice of themes, and metaphors prevalent in a text. Rome's image involves its historical demise. While the Greek tradition is almost exclusively tapped for its mythology, allusions to the Roman heritage tend to focus on its historical figures and circumstances.

Restricted access

The influence of Byron on Liszt was enormous, as is generally acknowledged. In particular the First Book of the Années de pèlerinage shows the poet’s influence in its choice of Byron epigraphs in English for four of the set of nine pieces. In his years of travel as a virtuoso pianist Liszt often referred to “mon byronisme.” The work by Byron that most affected Liszt is the long narrative poem Childe Harold’s Pilgrimage which was translated into many languages, including French. The word “pèlerinage” that replaced “voyageur” is a Byronic identity in Liszt’s thinking. The Byronic hero as Liszt saw him and imitated him in for example Mazeppa and Tasso is a figure who represented a positive force, suffering and perhaps a revolutionary, but definitely not a public enemy. Liszt’s life, viewed as a musical pilgrimage, led of course to Rome. Is it possible that Byron even influenced him in this direction? In this paper I try to give a portrait of the real Byron that hides behind the poseur of his literary works, and suggest that what drew Liszt to the English poet was precisely the man whom he sensed behind the artistic mask. Byron was not musical, but he was religious — as emerges from his life and his letters, a life which caused scandal to his English contemporaries. But today we can see that part of the youthful genius of the rebel Byron was his boldness in the face of hypocrisy and compromise — his heroism was simply to be true. In this we can see a parallel with the Liszt who left the piano and composed Christus. What look like incompatibilities are simply the connection between action and contemplation — between the journey and the goal. Byron, in fact, can help us follow the ligne intérieure which Liszt talked about in the 1830s.

Restricted access

-80. Discriminant analysis using mark-ovian automodels 73 80 Attorre, F., A. Stanisci and F. Bruno. 1997. The urban woods of Rome. Plant Biosystems 131: 113

Restricted access

The paper offers a direct and deliberative multi-dimensional valuation method, open to the active involvement of communities, and describes an experimental application for the selection of the best design idea for the rehabilitation of the Moretta road Area in Via Giulia in Rome. Some of the projects submitted in the ‘Concept and design competition’ were evaluated by a group of ‘judges’. After having explored the problem, the judges discussed among themselves and consulted experts and stakeholders, carrying out a multi-dimensional assessment. The valuation process led them, unanimously, to choose the project they regarded as the best.

Restricted access

foreign origins, what justifies their definition as ‘foreign’ is their conventional representation in the ancient literary sources as alien to the Roman mores . Cf. B eard , M.: The Cult of the ‘Great Mother’ in Imperial Rome. The Roman and the ‘foreign

Restricted access