Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 48 items for :

  • "Russian literature" x
  • Refine by Access: All Content x
Clear All

Summary  

In the article the conceptual model of Russian literature of the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st centuries is presented. This is the paradigmatic description of a) the content and aesthetic parameters of the literature which reflect the use of new literary material and new ways of its poetic interpretation; b) the inclusion of the literature into the changing episteme which conditions a world outlook system and the picture of the world which is reflected in literary works; c) the pragmatic purpose of the literature which is connected with the introduction of new values, which have to keep society safe and to provide social progress, into the social consciousness. From the viewpoints of content and aesthetic features Russian literature is characterized as finalizing, analytical, reorienting, warning, approving the principles of aesthetic pluralism in the conditions of freedom of speech and in the situation of postmodern culture. On the second level it reflects the processes of reorientation and changing of the episteme itself which include different world outlook systems, from “back-to-the-soil” movement to postmodernism. It appears as polysemantic and multi-variant, helping to understand what can be a base of being a human and to avoid collapsing at this time marked by the sign of catastrophism. In the respect of pragmatics Russian literature of the end of the 20th and the beginning of the 21st centuries is multifunctional. At first, it tries to have an influence upon the life in connection with the transition from totalitarian standards of existence to the more liberating and humane ones, which reflects the general trend of the motion of the mankind from the epoch of modernism to the epoch of postmodernism and spurs to search for decisions that would be suitable to the new reality. Secondly, it is involved in the processes of rebirth of national originality and the protection of the Russian ethnic interests. Thirdly, it resists the pressure of the mass culture. Fourthly, it participates in the creation of a new Internet literary environment and the transition to the new network forms of the functioning of literature. On the fifth place it forms a new type of reader, who enters into interactive conversation with literature. All this allows us to define modern Russian literature as a new social, cultural and aesthetic phenomenon, which proves the powerful surge of the creative energy in the unchained country.

Restricted access

Translations are not only an integral part of the development of a standard language but also a point of orientation in cultural affairs. In the case of Ukrainian, starting from the middle of the 19th century, mostly translations of fictional works from Western European languages played an important role. In contrast, Russian literature has been recognized dominantly within world literature. Even in the 1920s only selected works, and often not the major ones, were translated from Russian into Ukrainian. Only when the so-called policy of Ukrainization after 1933 came to an end, was a huge amount of translations from Russian prepared. By examining works from three different writers (Pushkin, Tolstoy, Gogol), who were at least by the 1930s all identified as Russian writers (but maybe of other origin), the author of this article tries to highlight different approaches to translations during Soviet times. A detailed analysis reflects the attempts to influence significant signs of culture and by this either put the translation in a more Ukrainian or a more Russian context.

Restricted access

The paper demonstrates the change in the topic of Russian literature under the pressure of revolutionary events in Russia from 1917 to 1921. The author considers the gap between the concepts of “land” and “people”, traditionally indivisible in the Russian linguistic image of the world. On the one hand, the “motherland” plays a redemptive role in relation to the people betrayed by her, on the other, being ready to take them into her space, she is more worthy than her people. Historical and biblical analogies are also given in the paper. The author traces the deconstruction of the concept “people” in Russian literature in the 20th century and at the turn of the 20th and the 21st century. She determines the connection of this process not only to the unique history of 20th-century Russia but also to the worldwide globalization process and notes the apparent weakening of the traditional relationship between “lands” and their people. The author analyzes the works written by D. Merezhkovsky, S. Bulgakov, M. Prishvin, A. Remizov, S. Durylin, and M. Voloshin between 1917 and 1920. She uses historical-typological and hermeneutical methods and also conceptual and mythopoetic approaches in her paper.

Restricted access

= Силард Л. Карнавальное сознание /карнавализация . Russian Literature 18 ( 1985 ): 151 – 175 . Силард 1993

Restricted access

This article demonstrates that the myth of Oedipus mentioned directly in the novel underlies A Common Story by Ivan Goncharov. In the extensive system of references to the myth exposed by us, Petr Aduev is brought into correlation with Oedipus in the fact that he, like Oedipus, involuntarily ruins his relatives. Under the influence of his uncle Alexander, Aduev ends up with the spiritual death, and the novel also contains a symbolic motif of incest. As a result of the husband’s inability to give the salvational love to his wife she becomes – as the novel says – “inanimate”. Elisabeth is also threatened with the actual death, though the illness itself has not commenced as of yet. A Common Story is a mythological novel, in which an ancient myth manifests itself in the reality contemporary to Goncharov.

Restricted access

The aim of the present paper is to reveal the allegorical and metaphorical plan of L. Tolstoy’s short story The Death of Ivan Ilyich through the problems of human and family relationships. The main aspects are rounded off by analysing the connected details.

Restricted access

Sirens became an essential element of the literary imagination in many European literatures in Romanticism and have remained popular ever since. Also, in Russian and Polish culture, the image of the dangerously alluring and transgressive female nymph called “rusalka” is omnipresent. In this paper, the authors use a comparative approach to trace the evolution of the “rusalka” motif from its creation in the Romantic period to its transformed (and often highly sexualized) use in present-day popular culture. From works written by Pushkin, Lermontov, Mickiewicz as well as Bal’mont and Gumilev (amongst others), we move on to contemporary actualizations of the motif in the music videos and lyrics of a Russian girl group (“Фабрика”), a Polish pop performer (Doda Elektroda) and a Russian folk-metal band (“Alkonost”). We argue that the centuries-old popularity of the “rusalka” motif can be ascribed to the theme’s core semantics of female transgression and adaptability that lends itself especially well to the sphere of pop and its remixing and resignifying practices.

Restricted access

In this article, the author attempts to apply the concept of counter-discourse developed by R. Terdiman on the basis of research of the French literature of the 19th century to studying the language game in Полунощники [At Midnight] by N. Leskov. The discourse analysis of the novel reveals that the author’s counter-discourse is built on the “sottisier” collected by the writer throughout his life, where commonplace utterances subjected to “re/citation” acquire a whole new meaning.

Restricted access

The present paper analyzes the poem Ode to Gratitude by the famous Russian 18th-century poet A. P. Sumarokov, not yet studied by literary scholars. The analysis shows that Sumarokov, as the founder of Russian classicism, mixed elements of various genres and specific to different literary traditions in some of his poems, thus he can be called a forerunner to 19th-century lyrics. Sumarokov’s stylistic innovations were facilitated by the necessity to encrypt Freemasonic ideas in a spiritual ode.

Restricted access