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L. Pumpyansky noted the frequent use of “Imperial formula” or “formula stretch of Russia” in 18th-century Russian poetry (mainly in Lomonosov’s works). This poetic structure is built by using the prepositions from and to: from one boundary to the other (“From the White sea to the Black sea”). The size of the Russian territory has always been a source of pride for Russian national consciousness, satisfying national geopolitical ambitions and, apparently, thus the “Imperial formula” has often been used in Russian poetry for over three centuries.

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Abstract

The present paper gives a positive answer to the question about the possibility of adequate poetic translation. It presents extracts of Russian poetry that contain various phonic devices (e.g. rhythmic variations, sound repetitions, vowel alternations, consonant clusters, etc.) which, in addition to other verbal means, make up the peculiar aesthetic value of a poetic work. The Hungarian translations of the extracts from Pushkin’s The Bronze Horseman and Eugene Onegin, Tyutchev’s Autumn Evening, and Tvardovsky’s Vassili Tyorkin, made by the prominent poets and translators Lajos Áprily, Árpád Galgóczy, and Lőrinc Szabó, masterly reproduce the phonic qualities of the Russian texts, and prove the validity of the Pushkinian claim on the “alliance of sound, thought, and sentiment” in lyric poetry.

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At the beginning of the 19th century, there was an intensive productive reception of the Corpus Tibullianum in Russian poetry, particularly of Tibullus’ elegy I 1. By analyzing the titles, the notes, and selected aspects of the main text of the six Russian translations of the elegy, Oraić Tolić’s Romantic notion of the paradigm shift from “illustrative” to “illuminative” quotation can be seen. However, this change does not take place in a linear fashion: Although the change in the titles and notes occurs in a consequential manner, the main texts meander between the stated poles.

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A new generation of Hungarian poets appeared in the 1960s, among them such excellent translators of Russian poetry as László Lator, Zsuzsa Rab, and András Fodor. Fodor was in his early twenties when he translated Pushkin’s Ruslan and L’udmila. This paper displays some characteristic excerpts of the poem so as to show how the translator succeeded in finding means to reproduce the onomapoetic and lexical elements of the original, the art of portraying the heroes, depicting landscapes and erotic scenes, and conveying the author’s lyric and ironical disgressions from the narration.

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The paper aims at a linguistically based analysis of one of the pearls of Russian love lyrics written by Tyutchev, and of its two Hungarian translations. Master of small forms, the poet concentrates his poetic devices (ambiguities, antitheses, repetitions, etc.) to a high degree, and attains to a harmonious fusion of different stylistic traits. The translation of the poem made by Lőrinc Szabó, a well-known Hungarian poet of the 20th century is handicapped by the use of an intermediate text, and some elements of his own poetical vision here and there outweigh essential features of the original. The translation of Árpád Galgóczy, one of the best contemporary translators of Russian poetry, comes in a lot of instances more close to the original.

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The publication of the poetic translations of the untimely deceased Hungarian poet István Baka opens a new page in the chronicle of Russian–Hungarian literary translation. The two volumes contain more than 630 translations from 30 poets, among them many (especially authors of “samizdat” and “tamizdat” literature) were not known until now to Hungarian readers not familiar with the Russian language. Baka’s selection of poets to be translated was determined by his intense affinity to the author based on the similarity of vital experience, poetic outlook on life, and artistic skill. Like the major poets of the “Silver Age” of Russian poetry, Baka had a special gift for transubstantiation, for creating a synthesis of his own individuality with those of several famous historical and artistic personalities and mythological figures. The paper displays some characteristic excerpts to illustrate the many-sided translatory art of Baka.

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This article is part of a doctoral thesis on the reception of Oriental art in early 20th century Russian poetry and fine arts. Analysing the poem that was originally published in the collection "Pillar of Fire" (1921), and comparing it to the poet's views on fine arts in general the author traces oriental influences on Gumilev's mature poetry. In her view "Per-sian Miniature" represents an. aesthetic framework that, through the medium of painting, places a work of art both as a representation and as a tangible physical reality in front of us. This double presence gives full justice to the artist's life experience turned immortal in art, serving a profane and a sacred function at the same time. The abstraction of the artist's passions in the painting awakens similarly gentle passions in the observer who also enters into a sensual relationship with the picture . This latter characteristic of the poem makes it into an example of the Acmeist cult of objects.

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Шаткий трон и зыбкое стекло

Семантика прилагательных сквозь призму поэзии

Studia Slavica
Author:
Олег Федосов

This paper is devoted to the corpus-based study of Russian adjectives шаткий ‘wobbly, unstable, shaky’ and зыбкий ‘unsteady, shaky’ in the context of Russian poetry. The comprehensive research shows that the similarity of these lexemes has only surface features. The symmetry of the two adjectives is discussed: they are synonymous practically in all the meanings they have but this semantic area has a lot of differences. The following differences are revealed: the adjective шаткий is used in its direct meaning more frequently than зыбкий, while the adjective зыбкий is used more frequently in metaphoric contexts. It is necessary to study how the hidden component of the meaning takes place in the “naive mind”.

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