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Ruthenian Minority . Нови Сад : ИК Про-метеј–КПД ДОК , 2010 . Фејса 2012 Фејса Михајло

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Mihajlo : Engleski uticaj na rusinski jezik / Anglijski upljiv na ruski jazik / The English Influence on the Ruthenian Language . Novi Sad , 2019 . Firis Hajnalka : Prezviska madjarskoho pohodzenja pri bačvansko-srimskih Rusinoch . Budapest , 2012

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FRICK 1985: D. A. Frick, Meletij Smotryc'kyj and the Ruthenian Language Question, in: Harvard Ukrainian Studies 9, 1985/1–2, 25–52. Meletij Smotryc'kyj and the Ruthenian Language Question

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The interwar period was crucial for the development of Polish–Ukrainian relations in the following decades. Political commentaries, studies in linguistics, social sciences, and legislative acts from this period reflect the changes of Polish attitudes towards the Ukrainian minority. In the late 1920s and 1930s, the traditional and exonymic terminology Rusin and ruski was gradually replaced by the new forms Ukrainiec and ukraiński.

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Polemics without Polemics

Myxajlo Andrella in Ruthenian (Ukrainian) Literary Space

Studia Slavica
Author: Andrii Danylenko

Наукового товариства iменi Шевченка 37 (5), 1900, 1–91, 38 (6), 1900, 91–162.) Frick 1994 = Frick D.: “Foolish Rus’”: On Polish Civilization, Ruthenian Self-hatred, and Kasijan Sakovyč. Harvard

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. The Language of the Bačka Ruthenians in Yugoslavia . The Slavic and East European Journal 10 ( 1966 ): 32 – 45 . Dubiel - Dmytryszyn 2012

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enzyklopadie 270/271). Sofia, September 1988, Linguistics, ed. by A. M. Schenker, Columbus 1988, 107-120. Фрик 1994 — D. A. FRICK "Foolish Rus'": On Polish Civilization, Ruthenian Self-Hatred, and 1979

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The Middle Ruthenian (Middle Belarusian and Middle Ukrainian) period is an important stage in the development of the Ukrainian and Belarusian languages. It is characterized by several significant innovations on all linguistic levels. Of utmost significance is the broad functionality of Middle Ruthenian as a literary language, particularly beginning from the second half of the 16th up to the middle of the 17th century.

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The study sums up the ethnographical achievements of Hiador Sztripszky (1876-1945), a now little-known Hungarian-Ruthenian ethnographer, bibliographer, linguist, literary historian and translator. The researcher, who had a thorough knowledge of the cultural history and ethnography/folkloristics of the Hungarians and the peoples living together with them, in particular of the Ruthenians and Romanians, did a great deal to study and make known the ethnocultural processes and influences. He also played a big role in collecting the material cultural heritage of the peoples of Transylvania for museums. After the Versailles Peace Treaty he was sent into early retirement as having been involved in the policy on the minorities, and in the last 25 years of his life he achieved substantial results mainly as a philologist in the study of the history and connections of the different ethnic groups and denominations. In addition to Sztripszky's work in ethnography, the study also discusses areas related to the latter problem.

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The loanword куранты examined in the present article is a case of the development of Russian “civilization” vocabulary in the 16th and 17th centuries. Research permits the conclusion that the semantic scope of the Russian term куранты was formed on the basis of different European sources for a long period. These sources include Vulgar Latin, Old French, Dutch, German and Polish. The mediation of colloquial Ruthenian ( проста мова ) is not to be excluded, either.

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