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The paper presents an exhaustive list of plant names in the Kāśyapīyakrsisūkti, the most important Sanskrit treatise on agriculture, horticulture and animal husbandry dated from the early medieval period. The Sanskrit names are given with full reference to the verses where they appear and together with the up-to-date botanical terms and occasionally with the current English names.

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Economic thought and the principles of economic policy appear in a full-fledged form in the Arthasastra of Kautilya, a text which has gained its present form between the fourth century B.C. and second century A.D. Although a great deal of ideas in this text concerning government and politics reappear in the early medieval times economicpolicy fell into totaloblivion. Kasyapiyakrsisukti, a Sanskrit text tentatively dated from the early medieval period has come down to us in a single manuscript and belonged to the group of forgotten Sanskrit works up to the recent times. Verses 683-777 form a lucid treatise on economic policy which had its roots in the Arthasastra and at the same time contain new ideas originating from the contemporary conditions.The type of economydepicted here reminds us of the situation in early medieval Europe.

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Three leaves written in Brāhmī script and kept in the Dunhuang Research Academy turn out to be parts of a bilingual text of Dharmaśarīrasūtra in Sanskrit and Uighur. After analysing several versions of Dharmaśarīrasūtra, it can be inferred that these three fragments belong to the Northern Brāhmī recensions which were circulated along the Northern Silk Road and are different from the Southern Brāhmī recensions popular along the Southern Route, such as the Khotanese version. This paper attempts to transcribe these fragments and make a thorough research on Dharmaśarīrasūtra, taking five relevant Chinese versions into account.

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Sanskrit and Prakrit pāmara

The semantic and social contents of a peculiar word

Acta Orientalia Academiae Scientiarum Hungaricae
Author:
Gyula Wojtilla

Sanskrit pāmara and its Prakrit and Modern Indo-Aryan equivalents have a broad semantic field. The meaning of the word ranges from a very negative connotation “a low man”, “an outcast”, “a fool” to a positive term denoting a peasant who is a member of a rural community with full powers. The present paper explores the various shades of meaning of the word and their possible social background. The term first appeared in early mediaeval times and has remained productive in the various Modern Indo-Aryan languages spoken in India. The negative connotations of the word are typical of traditional Sanskrit lexicons, while the positive ones were used by poets and playwrights.

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REFERENCES Primary Sources Saptaguṇavarṇanā parikathā , Sanskrit manuscript . Инв. № 804 , Tangut manuscript . Secondary Literature Bhikkhu Ñaṇamoli & Bhikkhu Bodhi . 2009 . The Middle Length Discourses of the Buddha: A Translation of the

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The detailed treatment of the Latin supine has been neglected both in scholarly literature and in language teaching, even though it is a very ancient form that has survived in an interesting way and was used even in late Latin. The fact that the Latin supine has a parallel in Sanskrit deserves attention. In this study I demonstrate that Priscian projected the Latin usage of his own time back to classical Latin, which fact was nevertheless not detrimental to his credibility.

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This paper contains a critical edition of an unpublished Sanskrit play preserved in an incomplete Nepalese manuscript dated to 1382. In the introduction an attempt is made to determine when and where the play might have been written, and on what possible sources the plot is based.

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(eds.) Brill’s Encyclopedia of Buddhism. Vol. I: Literature and Languages . Leiden and Boston : Brill , 129 – 137 . Hidas , Gergely 2020 . ‘Uṣṇīṣavijayā-dhāraṇī: The Complete Sanskrit Text Based on Nepalese Manuscripts.’ International Journal

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For over a century many Buddhist texts in Pali have been translated into English, the four main Nikāyas at least twice. Significant improvements have been made in regard to English translations of Pali texts. This paper provides five case studies that illustrate the problems and complexities involved in translating Pali texts. Examples are taken from four suttas of the Aṅguttara Nikāya. Various issues are addressed using textual and contextualised analyses. I attempt to offer solutions to some problems related to translating the Pali through different approaches, including style, philology, history, Buddhist thought and inter-religious relation.

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ABSTRACT

While it has long been noted that Chinese Buddhist translations contain many new lexical and syntactic elements that were created due to the contact between Indic and Chinese languages during the translation process, few attempts have been made to systematically explore the major mechanisms of such contact-induced creations. This paper examines six mechanisms of contact-induced lexical creations and three mechanisms of contact-induced syntactic creations in Chinese Buddhist translations. All of these mechanisms have parallels in non-Sinitic language contacts. The parallels demonstrate that Chinese Buddhist translations and non-Sinitic language contacts show striking similarities in the ways in which they brought about new lexical and syntactic elements.

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