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Scientometrics
Authors: Chuanfu Chen, Kai Sun, Gang Wu, Qiong Tang, Jian Qin, Kuei Chiu, Yushuang Fu, Xiaofang Wang, and Jing Liu

Abstract  

The quality and credibility of Internet resources has been a concern in scholarly communication. This paper reports a quantitative analysis of the use of Internet resources in journal articles and addresses the concerns for the use of Internet resources scholarly journals articles. We collected the references listed in 35,698 articles from 14 journals published during 1996 to 2005, which resulted in 1,000,724 citations. The citation data was divided into two groups: traditional citations and Web citations, and examined based on frequencies of occurrences by domain and type of Web citation sources. The findings included: (1) The number of Web citations in the journals investigated had been increasing steadily, though the quantity was too small to draw an inclusive conclusion on the data about their impact on scientific research; (2) A great disparity existed among different disciplines in terms of using information on the Web. Applied disciplines and interdisciplinary sciences tended to cite more information on the Web, while classical and experimental disciplines cited little of Web information; (3) The frequency of citations was related to the reputation of the author or the institution issuing the information, and not to the domain or webpage types; and (4) The researchers seemed to lack confidence in Internet resources, and Web information was not as frequently cited as reported in some publications before. The paper also discusses the need for developing a guideline system to evaluate Web resources regarding their authority and quality that lies in the core of credibility of Web information.

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Abstract  

Among Belver C. Griffith's many contributions to disciplinary communication is the idea that science and scholarship at large constitute a social system to be investigated empirically. This paper reports findings of an author co-citation analysis of the field of human behavioral ecology that expands Griffith's concept of the social system of scientific communication to fit a socioecological framework. Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling techniques are used to characterize the research specialty at large and portray five respondents' individual resource maps. The techniques reveal co-citation relationships among authors whose work they had referenced in recent articles. Survey data on searching and handling behaviors for an aggregated sample of 180 cited references are correlated with core-periphery zones of the individual maps. Findings that types of socially mediated communication and distinctive information foraging behaviors correlate with different zones of a bibliographic microhabitat support an interpretation that active specialty members conform to foraging efficiency principles as predicted by prey-choice models from optimal foraging theory.

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Abstract  

Among Belver C. Griffith's many contributions to disciplinary communication is the idea that science and scholarship at large constitute a social system to be investigated empirically. This paper reports findings of an author co-citation analysis of the field of human behavioral ecology that expands Griffith's concept of the social system of scientific communication to fit a socioecological framework. Cluster analysis and multidimensional scaling techniques are used to characterize the research specialty at large and portray five respondents' individual resource maps. The techniques reveal co-citation relationships among authors whose work they had referenced in recent articles. Survey data on searching and handling behaviors for an aggregated sample of 180 cited references are correlated with core-periphery zones of the individual maps. Findings that types of socially mediated communication and distinctive information foraging behaviors correlate with different zones of a bibliographic microhabitat support an interpretation that active specialty members conform to foraging efficiency principles as predicted by prey-choice models from optimal foraging theory.

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Abstract  

The rich body of literature examining communications flow in the research context, an area where Professor Belver Griffith made major contributions, has very direct relevance to the relatively newly emerging recognition in the business community of the importance of knowledge creation and deployment to the competitive performance of an organization. This essay examines and delineates some of those lessons, specifically the tension between open and rich communications versus the need to protect intellectual property; the importance of environmental awareness and serendipity, and achieving the correct balance with efficient use of information searching time; the importance of end-user training; and crafting the balance in knowledge management between codifications and personalization.

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Veer Martens 2009 ; White and McCain 1989 , 1997 ). ACA is a central part of relational citation analysis studies. These studies clearly show the power of citation analysis in the study of scholarly communication patterns in research fields

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Abstract  

The titles of scientific articles have a special significance. We examined nearly 20 million scientific articles and recorded the development of articles with a question mark at the end of their titles over the last 40 years. Our study was confined to the disciplines of physics, life sciences and medicine, where we found a significant increase from 50% to more than 200% in the number of articles with question-mark titles. We looked at the principle functions and structure of the titles of scientific papers, and we assume that marketing aspects are one of the decisive factors behind the growing usage of question-mark titles in scientific articles.

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Abstract

This article defines different perspectives for citations and introduces four concepts: Self-expected Citations, Received Citations, Expected Citations, and Deserved Citations. When comparing permutations of these four classes of perspectives, there are up to 145 kinds of equality/inequality relations. From these numerous relations, we analyze the difference between the Matthew Effect and the Matthew Phenomenon. We provide a precise definition and point out that many previous empirical research studies on the Matthew Effect based on citations belong primarily to the Matthew Phenomenon, and not the true meaning of the Matthew Effect. Due to the difficulty in determining the Deserved Citations, the Matthew Effect is in itself difficult to measure, although it is commonly believed to influence citation counts. Furthermore, from the theoretical facts, we outline four new effects/phenomena: the Self-confidence Effect/Phenomenon, the Narcissus Effect/Phenomenon, the Other-confidence Effect/Phenomenon, and the Flattery Effect/Phenomenon, and we discuss additional influencing factors.

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Scholarly communication and bibliometrics Cronin , B. (eds.) Annual Review of Information Science and Technology Information Today Inc Medford, NJ 3 – 72 . Cronin , B

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of the research activity and scholarly communication of different fields, as in the case of cross-disciplinary science, or innovation research. The concept could also help to elaborate the concept of disciplinary incoherency, and to understand the

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Abstract  

With the primary goal of exploring whether citation analysis using scientific papers found on the Web as a data source is a worthwhile means of studying scholarly communication in the new digital environment, the present case study examines the scholarly communication patterns in XML research revealed by citation analysis of ResearchIndex data and SCI data. Results suggest that citation analysis using scientific papers found on the Web as a data source has both advantages and disadvantages when compared with citation analysis of SCI data, but is nonetheless a valid method for evaluating scholarly contributions and for studying the intellectual structure in XML research.

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