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://www.robertocrivello.com/styleinitalian.html Dolgan, M. 1998. L’infinitif dans le discourse proustien et dans sa version Slovène. BA Dissertation . University of Ljubljana. Englund Dimitrova, B. 2005. Expertise and Explicitation in the Translation Process

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Jaklitsch, K. 2000. Motiv Turkov v slovenski literaturi . Unpublished BA thesis. University of Ljubljana, Faculty of Arts, Department of Slovene Studies. Jaklitsch K

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Practice 1 John Benjamins Amsterdam/Philadelphia . 00. FIDA, The Corpus of Slovene Language 2000. http://www.fida.net/slo/index.html ; http

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pesticide residues in apples, lettuce and potato of the Slovene origin, 2001–04. Fd Addit. Contam. , 23 , 164–173. Kmecl V. Monitoring of pesticide residues in apples, lettuce

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Until the mid-19th century, Slovenia had two distinct territorial fields of language use that coexisted in the central and eastern Slovene linguistic, administrative-political, and geographical areas: (1) central Slovene (the so-called kranjščina) and (2) eastern Slovene (the language of Prekmurje and eastern Štajerska). Their half-century long convergence, permeation and entwinement resulted in a formation of the unified norm of standard Slovene in the middle of the 19th century (the so-called new Slovene or unified standard Slovene). In the past, this double development of the Slovene standard language was incorrectly explained – instead of applying a double notion based on historical development (central Slovene standard language and eastern Slovene standard language), an inaccurate opposite emerged: standard language vs. standard language delusions. The attempt of a black and white portrayal of the linguistic circumstances in the development of Slovenian was to enact the linguistic equation central vs. peripheral = norm vs. particularism. Through this attempt, standard Slovene was equal to the central, correct and distinguished language with its opposite, the incorrect regional language of the Slovenian language periphery.

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Due to processes of internationalisation and European integration, countries such as Slovenia have to accommodate many new textual genres, which are either introduced via translation, or written in Slovene for later translation into English. This paper presents an analytical framework developed with this situation in mind and describes how it was applied to a particular translation of a political progress report. The aim was to support the development of a more systematic approach to the production and translation of such texts. The model draws upon discourse analysis, genre analysis and contrastive functional rhetoric, and is compatible with functional approaches to translation. The top-down analysis begins with the discussion of the background to the report and its writing, the participants in the translation process, the training and support provided, and the translation strategies employed. We then go on to consider the broader linguistic and cultural background, including the relevant genre conventions. This is followed by a summary of a detailed analysis of text profile, coherence, cohesion, information structure and register features. The emphasis is on the task facing the reader and whether the communicative purpose of the text is achieved or not.

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This contribution explores the Slovene view of Turks through an analysis of non-periodical printed matter from the 16th century and of newspaper articles published in Slovene lands from the 18th century to the present. This journalistic view was shaped by the historical experience from the time of the Turkish incursions. An extensive corpus of materials reveals an ambivalent attitude to Turks in the Slovene lands. On the one hand, journalism — under the influence of the Habsburg state framework and hence the Western political and historical discourse — portrays them in an extremely negative way as enemies of Christendom. On the other, as early as the 19th century liberal politicians in Slovene lands pointed out that such views were outdated and did not make sense. In the contemporary period, stereotypical thinking is yielding to intercultural dialogue.

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The goal of the present study is twofold. The first goal is to identify the current status of Slovene literature in the Turkish literary system and to explore the ways in which Slovene and Yugoslav literatures have been (non-)translated into Turkish during the past 50 years. After providing a background to the scarcity of translations from the languages of the former Yugoslav republics into Turkish, the paper proceeds with pursuing its second goal and sets out to investigate a major point of contact between Yugoslav literature and the Turkish literary field by focusing on the first Turkish edition of Ivo Andrić’s famous novel, The Bridge over the Drina (Drina Köprüsü) published in 1962. The novel and the discourse formed around it will enable a problematization of a number of translational issues that have recently been under close scrutiny in translation studies. One of them is translation movements among the less widely spoken languages and the conditions that mediate literary contacts among these languages as exemplified by the case of Turkish and Serbo-Croatian. The paper will also discuss the issue of non-translation in connection with this. A second issue which will be tackled in the paper is the Nobel Prize for Literature and its influence over publishers, translators and readers, as exemplified by the interest shown in Andrić, following shortly after his reception of the prize in 1961.

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The Slovene ballad Animals Bury the Hunter is an animal narrative song of jocular character. It tells of the burial of a hunter and of a funeral procession not composed of humans but wild animals (a bear, foxes, hares, a wolf, cranes and partridges, song birds, etc.) who seem to derive great joy from the event. The analysis of the song's 31 variants reveals the changes made to the song over the course of time, as it survived through different historical periods and spread throughout Slovenia. I attempt to show that the ballad was used as a model for painted beehive panels featuring the same motif. In addition to the analysis, I am concerned with the sociological and ethical elements of the ballad. The paper proposes at least three possible theses: 1. The song is part of the conception of a topsy-turvy world, where the roles and mutual relationships of people and animals are reversed in an ironic sociological view of the world.  2. The song is a critique of one class by another: peasants mocking hunters who belong to a different social stratum. 3. The song is a representation of “pre-Cartesian” times, when animals were not “mere machines” without feelings, to be treated by man as objects with no ethical significance. It points to the ethical aspects of the human treatment of animals.

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