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techniques suitable for the heat of hydration evaluation monitoring solution calorimetry and isothermal calorimetry has been selected. Solution calorimetry is convenient for long-term monitoring of the heat of hydration and also, e.g., for rapid determination

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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Eunice F. S. Vieira, Antonio R. Cestari, Wagner A. Carvalho, Cíntia dos S. Oliveira, and Renata A. Chagas

nature of interactions dyes/scales was investigated by isothermal solution calorimetry using the membrane breaking technique [ 17 – 21 ]. Simultaneous determination of interaction effects, Q int , and amount of dye that interacts, n int , are described

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Instrumentation and calibration of the Calvet calorimeter

Enthalpy of solution of PrBr3 at standard conditions

Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: Beata Salamon, Jan Kapała, and Marcelle Gaune-Escard

thin walls. In general, we conclude that the presented equipment is respective for solution calorimetry and for the determination of enthalpies of formation for compounds at standard conditions. Heat of solution of solid PrBr 3

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The enthalpy of solution of KCl in H2O (1∶2000 mol·mol−1) at 298.15 K was measured in an interlaboratory test in the G.D.R. The test material was prepared in the ASMW laboratories. The purity found on the high-precision coulometric titration of chloride was 0.9999±0.0001 g·g−1. The consensus value of the enthalpy of solution in the test was ΔH s 298.15=17.47±0.07 kJ·mol−1. This result is in good agreement with experimental values from recognized international scientific laboratories. The test material is applicable as a CRM.

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Abstract

Here, we report for the first time the direct and simultaneous determination of kinetic and energetic parameters of Cr(VI) sorption on chemically modified fish scales (GA-scale) using solution microcalorimetry. Characterization has suggested that electrostatic interactions between scales collagen positive charges and chromate negative charges constitute the majority of the interactions. The microcalorimetric kinetic data of Cr(VI) sorption on GA-scale were successful adjusted to a three-parameter exponential function. The enthalpies of Cr(VI) sorption on GA-scale are highly exothermic (from −226.43 to −183.79 kJ mol−1), and Cr(VI) interaction energies decrease as initial Cr(VI) in solution increases. The kinetic and thermodynamic from solution microcalorimetry results suggest that the interactions GA-scale/Cr(VI) occur mainly by surface reactions. The maximum adsorption capacity of GA-scale for Cr(VI) was found to be comparable with some commercial adsorbent samples.

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Abstract  

The enthalpies of solution
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{sol}^{{}} H_{m}^{{}}$$ \end{document}
of polymorphic forms I and II of theophylline in water at 298.15 K using the isoperibol solution calorimeter have been determined in the range of concentration (0.311–1.547) · 10−3 /mol · kg−1. The enthalpies of hydration
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{hyd}^{{}} H_{m}^{o}$$ \end{document}
were determined from the experimentally obtained the enthalpies of solution for aqueous solutions and previously determined enthalpies of sublimation
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{s}^{g} H_{m}^{o} .$$ \end{document}
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Abstract  

The molar heat capacity and the standard (p 0 = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation of the crystalline of bis(glycinate)lead(II), Pb(gly)2; bis(dl-alaninate)lead(II), Pb(dl-ala)2; bis(dl-valinate)lead(II), Pb(dl-val)2; bis(dl-valinate)cadmium(II), Cd(dl-val)2 and bis(dl-valinate)zinc(II), Zn(dl-val)2, were determined, at T = 298.15 K, by differential scanning calorimetry, and high precision solution-reaction calorimetry, respectively. The standard molar enthalpies of formation of the complexes in the gaseous state, the mean molar metal–ligand dissociation enthalpies, M(II)–amino acid,
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\langle D_{\text{m}} \rangle$$ \end{document}
(M–L), were derived and compared with analogous copper(II)–ligand and nickel(II)–ligand.θθ
M(II)–amino acid
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\Updelta_{\text{f}} H_{\text{m}}^{\text{o}}$$ \end{document}
(cr)/kJ mol−1
Bis(glycinate)lead(II), Pb(gly)2 −998.9 ± 1.9
Bis(dl-alaninate)lead(II), Pb(ala)2 −1048.7 ± 1.8
Bis(dl-valinate)lead(II), Pb(val)2 −1166.3 ± 2.5
Bis(dl-valinate)cadmium(II), Cd(val)2 −1243.7 ± 2.7
Bis(dl-valinate)zinc(II), Zn(val)2 −1306.1 ± 2.3
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Journal of Thermal Analysis and Calorimetry
Authors: M. R. Bissengaliyeva, L. P. Ogorodova, L. V. Mel'chakova, and M. F. Vigasina

determined by the oxide melt solution calorimetry method. Solution was prepared by the method of “drop” permitting to measure simultaneously both increment of the specimen enthalpy and enthalpy of its solution [( H 973 o − H 298.15 o ) + Δ sol H 973 o ] = Δ

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, 18 ]. Solution calorimetry is the most important of the techniques described in the literature for directly measuring the complexation constant and other thermodynamic properties associated with encapsulation [ 19 ]. The present work investigates the

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