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-authorship relationships have become the most important mediator in Japan's national innovation system. In the case of South Korea (hereafter “Korea”), the exploitation of international linkages has played a critical role in enabling the country's national R

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1 Introduction In 1960, South Korea was amongst the world's poorest countries with a GDP per capita of US $158. By the 1990s however, they had reached a GDP per capita of $6,516; and in 2018, according to the World Bank, it was as high as $31

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Twitter use among five prominent South Korean (hereafter “Korean”) politicians and mapping Twitter networks of these politicians. Mapping-oriented visualization, together with traditional narratives and numbers, should facilitate hermeneutic accessibility

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Abstract  

This study evaluates trends in quality of nanotechnology and nanoscience papers produced by South Korean authors. The metric used to gauge quality is ratio of highly cited nanotechnology papers to total nanotechnology papers produced in sequential time frames. In the first part of this paper, citations (and publications) for nanotechnology documents published by major producing nations and major producing global institutions in four uneven time frames are examined. All nanotechnology documents in the Science Citation Index [SCI, 2006] for 1998, 1999–2000, 2001–2002, 2003 were retrieved and analyzed in March 2007. In the second part of this paper, all the nanotechnology documents produced by South Korean institutions were retrieved and examined. All nanotechnology documents produced in South Korea (each document had at least one author with a South Korea address) in each of the above time frames were retrieved and analyzed. The South Korean institutions were extracted, and their fraction of total highly cited documents was compared to their fraction of total published documents. Non-Korean institutions that co-authored papers were included as well, to offer some perspective on the value of collaboration.

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This study performs a webometric analysis to explore the communication characteristics of scientific knowledge in a national scholarly Web space comprising top ranking universities and government supported research institutions in South Korea. We found significant differences in scholarly communication activity as well as linking behavior among different subspaces in addition to institutional differences. We also found the usefulness of the ADM approach in analyzing the metric data containing extreme outliers and discovered the directory model as the most appropriate. Page counts were found significantly correlated with inlinks as well as with outlinks at the directory level in the whole scholarly Web space.

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Depth distribution of239,240Pu and137Cs in the soils of South Korea have been studied. The average accumulated depositions were estimated roughly to be 54.8±32.1 Bq·m–2 for239,240Pu, 1.6±1.0 Bq· ·m–2 for238Pu and 1982.8±929.1 Bq·m–2 for137Cs. The activity ratios of239,240Pu/137Cs in soils were found to be in the narrow range of 0.0153 to 0.0364 with a mean value of 0.0230±0.006. The concentrations of239,240Pu and137Cs in soils decrease exponentially with increasing the soil depth. A significant correlation was found between the concentration of239,240Pu and that of137Cs. The activity ratios of239,240Pu/137Cs tend to increase slightly with increasing soil depth.

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Introduction The rapid technological development of South Korea (hereafter Korea) has been well documented, but there has been little rigorous data analysis of collaboration and scientific co-authorship among Korean researchers

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Summary This paper elaborates on the Triple Helix model for measuring the emergence of a knowledge base of socio-economic systems. The ‘knowledge infrastructure’ is measured using multiple indicators: webometric, scientometric, and technometric. The paper employs this triangulation strategy to examine the current state of the innovation systems of South Korea and the Netherlands. These indicators are thereafter used for the evaluation of the systemness in configurations of university-industry-government relations. South Korea is becoming somewhat stronger than the Netherlands in terms of scientific and technological outputs and in terms of the knowledge-based dynamics; South Korea’s portfolio is more traditional than that of the Netherlands. For example, research and patenting in the biomedical sector is underdeveloped. In terms of the Internet-economy, the Netherlands seem oriented towards global trends more than South Korea; this may be due to the high component of services in the Dutch economy.

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Factor 151 # Llsan (the name of a city in South Korea) 74 Blackberry 536

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Journal of Radioanalytical and Nuclear Chemistry
Authors: A. Ringbom, Klas Elmgren, Karin Lindh, Jenny Peterson, Theodore Bowyer, James Hayes, Justin McIntyre, Mark Panisko, and Richard Williams

Abstract  

Following the claimed nuclear test in the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea (DPRK) on October 9, 2006, and a reported seismic event, a mobile system for sampling of atmospheric xenon was transported to the Republic of South Korea (ROK) in an attempt to detect possible emissions of radioxenon in the region from a presumed test. Five samples were collected in the ROK during October 11–14, 2006 near the ROK–DPRK border, and thereafter transported to the Swedish Defense Research Agency (FOI) in Stockholm, Sweden, for analysis. Following the initial measurements, an automatic radioxenon sampling and analysis system was installed at the same location in the ROK, and measurements on the ambient atmospheric radioxenon background in the region were performed during November 2006 to February 2007. The measured radioxenon concentrations strongly indicate that the explosion in October 9, 2006 was a nuclear test. The conclusion is further strengthened by atmospheric transport models. Radioactive xenon measurement was the only independent confirmation that the supposed test was in fact a nuclear explosion and not a conventional (chemical) explosive.

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