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of closeness to or divergence from the original, and on evaluating the translators' choices when transferring Sovietisms . These crucial linguistic elements of Bulgakov's epoch refer to culturally, historically and socially specific terms from the

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This paper will analyze Hungary's political, military and economic role in the Soviet Empire and the implications of this for the Soviet Union's response to the 1956 revolution and war of independence. The paper will review Soviet politics within the imperial-ideological paradigm and will argue that Hungary served as a Marxist-Leninist client state that fits the description given by Edward Luttwak with the exception that economics played a hitherto unappreciated, crucial role in Soviet expansion. Ideology shaped in the Kremlin's perception of the Hungarian scene as well as world politics.

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all-popular patriotic cause for the defence of the Soviet homeland, thanks to the regime’s temporarily encouraging religious and national sentiments. Meanwhile, however, he rigorously kept basic strategy unchanged in view of preventing any concession

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The Soviet Union had the chance to develop its sphere of influence in the Central and Eastern Europe 1 following the Second World War and the weakness of capitalism in Europe. 2 In Asia, Japan lost control in East Asia and the Chinese Communist

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The socialist revolution and the collapse of the USSR in the 20th century affected all spheres of Russian public life, including the usage of language. Today, the use of Russian shows divergent tendencies toward Sovietness and Soviet newspeak (новояз). The linguistic field of Post-Soviet era is standing on the opposite axis, i.e., on the one hand, on the denial of all Sovietness, and on the inheritance and reproduction of Sovietness, on the other. This paper discusses the reflections of Soviet newspeak in the modern Russian language, mainly, in areas such as: 1) the use of Sovietisms as precedent texts, 2) the language of Russian Internet subculture, and 3) the modern Russian political language.

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-communist transition in Central and Eastern Europe (CEE) (in 1989–1991) and former Soviet Union (FSU) (1991–1992). In the 1990s and early 2000s, the comparison of both transition experiences was a popular topic in economic literature and often the subject of hot

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Abstract  

A detailed examination is made of the 1973 US and Soviet serials holdings of the British Library Lending Division (BLLD), the most comprehensive collection of active scientific and technological serials in the world. In total, 6075 US and 2399 Soviet serials were identified. These serials were then assigned on the basis of their titles to over 200 scientific and technological specialty areas. These assignments clearly show that the US is substantially more active than the USSR in the life sciences and social sciences, while the USSR is relatively more active in the physical and engineering sciences. When comparing the absolute size of the US and Soviet serial counts, it is seen that the US outpublishes the USSR in all major fields (i.e., clinical medicine, biomedical research, biology, chemistry, physics, earth/space science, engineering/technology, mathematics/statistics, psychology, and the social sciences).

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Mukomel, V. (2005): Migration Policy of Russia (Post-Soviet Context) . Moscow: ISRAN Mukomel V. Migration Policy of Russia (Post-Soviet Context

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Biography). (Budapest: 1956-os Intézet, 1996). The Balkan Department of MID (Valkov) to the Soviet consul in Győr (Iniushkin). January 26 1953. AVPRF Fond 077 opis 33 papka 164 delo 200. Memorandum by the

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, Al. Alfred Erich Senn, "Lithuania: Rights and responsibilities of independence," in: Ian Bremmer and Ray Taras, eds, New States, New Politics: Building the Post-Soviet Nations (Cambridge, 1997), 363-365; Richard J. Krickus

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