Search Results

You are looking at 1 - 4 of 4 items for :

  • "Szabadka/Subotica" x
  • All content x
Clear All

This paper discusses Danilo Kiš’s relationship to Hungarian culture in general and Hungarian literature specifically. It also presents Kis’s views of the regional geography of Pannonia and analyzes the three complementary elements in Kis’s identity: the Serbian, the Jewish, and the Hungarian.

Restricted access

Continuing with his earlier publications (Művészettörténeti Értesítő) the author presents new goldsmith’s marks and mark variants found in private collections and the art trade and makes an attempt to decode them. For already published marks he relies on Elemér Kőszeghy’s book (Elemér Kőszeghy: Hungarian goldsmith’s marks from the Middle Ages to 1867. Budapest 1936) and for the Pest-Buda marks on Ilona P. Brestyánszky’s work (History of goldsmith’s art in Pest-Buda. Budapest 1977), referring to the running numbers in these works. He presents new data about the goldsmiths of Pest, Brassó (Braşov, Kronstadt, Romania), Debrecen, Eperjes (Prešov, Preschau, Slovakia), Lőcse (Levoča, Leutschau, Slovakia), Nagyvárad (Oradea, Großwardein, Romania), Rimaszombat (Rimavská Sobota, Gross-Steffelsdorf, Slovakia), Szabadka (Subotica, Serbia) and Szatmárnémeti (Satu Mare, Romania).

Restricted access

Abstract

Similarly to its predecessors, the 14th installment of the time-honoured series adds new goldsmith's marks to the ones known from earlier publications (Elemér Kőszeghy 1936, Ilona P. Brestyánszky 1977). On the basis of registry research it provides new data on 18–19th century goldsmiths with additional information from urban censuses. This time Pest-based goldsmiths are highlighted from the first half of the 19th century, on the basis of works by József Blettl, József Redl, János Hoser and Kristóf Holl that cropped up in the art market, followed by Eperjes-based David Schuller's and the Nagyvárad goldsmith István Nádudvary's works, the latter owned by the Calvinist diocese. After identifying marks from Besztercebánya and Rimaszombat, the paper enlarges upon the Rozsnyó master Samuel Bablirik's works in public and private collections. From former Southern Hungary (today Serbia) the masters of Nagybecskerek (Zrenjanin) and Szabadka (Subotica) are introduced, together with their clientele: Martinus Zimmerer, Johann Christian Parbs, the goldsmiths called Nikolits and the noted Vojnich family.

Restricted access

Abstract

Czech itinerant painter Mathias Hanisch (c. 1754, Prague − 1806, Vukovár) moved from the hereditary lands to Trencsén (Trenčín) in Hungary in 1788 and lived there until 1791. From this period the signed picture of the high altar in the Church of All Saints in Kocskó (Horné Kočkovce) (1790) has long been known. He moved to Zombor (Sombor), the seat of Bács-Bodrog county around 1793 where he worked for nearly a decade; it is not too far-fetched to regard him as the painter of the Kalocsa-Bács Archiepiscopacy. Our examinations have already resulted in twelve altar pictures and over forty portraits painted by him in Hungary.

The Franciscans of Szabadka (Subotica) preserve 32 pieces of a unique series of 35 paintings of Franciscan saints and blessed persons painted in 1793–95, and a votive picture of Saint Mary of the Snows. In the collection of Szabadka museum, the portrait of Anna Barich can be attributed to Matthias Hanisch. His signed altar picture of the Crucifixion (1794) came to the Zombor museum from a private chapel in Doroszló (Doroslovo). He painted the pictures of the side altars of St Joseph and Ss John and Paul in 1796. He presumably completed the portraits of historian István Katona as well as seven archbishops of Kalocsa together with depictions of the sainted kings Stephen and Ladislas around 1800 in Kalocsa where he is presumed to have moved to live in that year. He painted the pictures of the high altar and side altars in the St Anne parish church of Jánoshalma (St John of Nepomuk and Crucifixion) in 1801 and the picture of the high altar of the St Roch chapel in Baja in 1802. The votive picture of the Virgin in the Baja inner city parish church and the votive picture of Vodica-Máriakönnye probably date from the same year. Hanisch painted the St Emeric high altar picture for the parish church of Doroszló around 1803. The high altar picture of Bácsbokod shows St Elizabeth of Hungary, also painted in the first years of the 19th century. He moved to Vukovár, the centre of Szerém county, around 1803. The Franciscans of Vukovár have preserved his portraits of legal scholar Dr. Verbőczi and provincial Ivan Velikanović (1803, 1805). When he moved off, he still accepted commissions from Bácska: in 1805 he “renovated” the Last Supper in the refectory of the Franciscan monastery at Bács (Bač) by Paulus Senser (1737), and in 1806 he painted the monumental high altar picture for the parish church of Ss Peter and Paul in Monostorszeg (Bački Monostor).

The sources are silent about Hanisch's studies – he probably learnt the trade in some family workshop. The level of his art was similar to that of the contemporary Hungarian masters, but owing to his lengthy presence in the southern areas he received a high number of commissions in the area just being revived, repopulated with a multitude of ethnic groups and different religions.

Restricted access