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Abstract  

In situ leaching of uranium ores with sulfuric acid during active uranium mining activity on the Gessenheap has caused longstanding environmental problems of acid mine drainage and elevated concentrations of uranium. To study there remediation measures the test site Gessenwiese, a recultivated former uranium mining heap near Ronnenburg/East Thuringia/Germany, was installed as a part of a research program of the Friedrich-Schiller University Jena to study, among other techniques, the phytoremediation capacity of native and selected plants towards uranium. In the first step the uranium speciation in surface seepage and soil pore waters from Gessenwiese, ranging in pH from 3.2 to 4.0, were studied by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Both types of water samples showed mono-exponential luminescence decay, indicating the presence of only one major species. The detected emission bands were found at 477.5, 491.8, 513.0, 537.2, 562.3, and 590.7 nm in case of the surface water samples, and were found at 477.2, 493.2, 513.8, 537.0, 562.4, and 590.0 nm in case of the soil water samples. These characteristic peak maxima together with the observed mono-exponential decay indicated that the uranium speciation in the seepage and soil pore waters is dominated by the uranium (VI) sulfate species UO2SO4(aq). Due to the presence of luminescence quenchers in the natural water samples the measured luminescence lifetimes of the UO2SO4(aq) species of 1.0–2.6 μs were reduced in comparison to pure uranium sulfate solutions, which show a luminescence lifetime of 4.7 μs. These results convincingly show that in the pH range of 3.2–4.0 TRLFS is a suitable and very useful technique to study the uranium speciation in naturally occurring water samples.

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Abstract  

The complex formation of uranium(VI) with salicylhydroxamic, benzohydroxamic, and benzoic acid was investigated by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). We observed in all three systems a decrease in the fluorescence intensity with increasing ligand concentration. All identified complexed uranyl species are of the type MpLqHr. In the uranium(VI)-salicylhydroxamate system a 1: 1 complex with a stability constant of log β 111 = 17.34±0.06 and a 1: 2 complex with a stability constant of log β 122 = 35.0±0.11 was identified. Also in the uranium(VI)-benzohydroxamate system the stability constants are determined to be log β 110 = 7.92±0.11 and log β 120 = 16.88±0.49. In the uranium(VI)-benzoate system only a 1: 1 complex is existent with a stability constant of log β 110 = 3.56±0.05.

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Abstract  

Cryogenic techniques are currently used in scanning tunnelling microscopy (STM) and single molecule spectroscopy. Recently such cryogenic devices have also been adapted to time resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) systems applied to uranium(VI). In our study, we interpret TRLFS results obtained for the uranyl(VI) glucose system at room temperature (RT) and under cryogenic conditions of 153 K (cryo-TRLFS). A uranyl(VI) glucose complex was only identified by cryo-TRLFS measurements at pH 5 and not by RT measurements. The uranyl(VI) glucose complex was characterized by five emission bands at 499.0, 512.1, 525.2, 541.7, and 559.3 nm and a fluorescence lifetime of 20.9 ± 2.9 μs. The uranyl(VI) glucose complex formation constant was calculated for the first time to be logßI=0.1 M = 15.25 ± 0.96. Cryo-TRLFS investigation opens up new possibilities for the determination of complex formation constants since interfering quenching effects often encounter at RT are suppressed by measurements at cryogenic conditions.

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Abstract  

Heavy metals like the actinides possess a high risk potential to the environment not only because of their radiotoxicity but also due to their chemical toxicology. Uranium as one of the major actinide elements has to be considered in particular. Under reducing conditions, tetravalent uranium occurs primarily in the environment. To date, a lack of appropriate analytical techniques that featured sufficient sensitivity made it difficult to study the aqueous phosphate chemistry of uranium(IV) as such complexes show only low solubility. A novel time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy system was set up recently and optimized to do research on uranium(IV). By application of this laser system we could successfully study uranium(IV) phosphate in concentration ranges where no precipitation or formation of colloids occurred. At pH = 1.0, U4+ and one uranium(IV) phosphate complex existed in parallel in aqueous solution. The complex could be identified as [U(H2PO4)]3+. Determination of its corresponding complex formation constant via two different evaluation methods resulted in the finding of (1)
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\log \beta_{121}^{ \circ } = 2 6. 3 7 \pm 0. 7 6$$ \end{document}
and (2)
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\log \beta_{121}^{ \circ } = 2 6. 4 3 \pm 0. 2 3$$ \end{document}
. Both values prove that [U(H2PO4)]3+ is a very stable complex in solution under experimental conditions. As they are in very good agreement with each other, the total complex formation constant was determined by means of the weighted average out of (1) and (2). It was calculated to be
\documentclass{aastex} \usepackage{amsbsy} \usepackage{amsfonts} \usepackage{amssymb} \usepackage{bm} \usepackage{mathrsfs} \usepackage{pifont} \usepackage{stmaryrd} \usepackage{textcomp} \usepackage{upgreek} \usepackage{portland,xspace} \usepackage{amsmath,amsxtra} \pagestyle{empty} \DeclareMathSizes{10}{9}{7}{6} \begin{document} $$\log \beta_{121}^{ \circ } = 2 6. 4 2 \pm 0. 2 2$$ \end{document}
.
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Abstract  

The application of UV-Vis and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLF) spectroscopies to direct speciation of uranium(VI) in environmental samples offers various prospects that have, however, serious limitations. While UV-Vis spectroscopy is probably not sensitive enough to detect uranium(VI) species in the majority of environmental samples, TRLFS is principially able to speciate uranium(VI) at very low concentration levels in the nanomol range. Speciation by TRLFS can be based on three parameters: excitation spectrum, emission spectrum and lifetime of the fluorescence emission process. Due to quenching effects, the lifetime may not be expected to be as characteristic as, e.g., the emission spectrum. Quenching of U(VI) fluorescence by reaction with organic substances, inorganic ions and formation of carbonate radicals is one important limiting factor in the application of U(VI) fluorescence spectroscopy. Fundamental photophysical criteria are illustrated using UV-Vis and fluorescence spectra of U(VI) hydrolysis and carbonato species as examples.

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Abstract  

The complex formation of curium(III) with L2-aminobutyric acid was characterized by time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS) at trace Cm(III) concentrations (3·10−7 M). The various curium(III) species, MpHqLr, identified are characterized by their individual luminescence spectra and luminescence lifetimes. The following formation constants were determined log β101 = 5.17±0.07, log β102 = 9.00±0.07, and log β103 = 11.30±0.09 at ionic strength I = 0.5M. Possible structures of the curium aminobutyrate species will be discussed on the basis of the luminescence lifetime measurements and the magnitude of the formation constants.

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Abstract  

The behavior of (UO2)2(OH) 2 2+ has been investigated in solid-liquid equilibria under 100%, 8%, 1%, 0.3% and 0.03% CO2 partial pressure as well as in undersaturated systems in equilibrium with air at 24±2°C in 0.1M NaClO4 solutions. From spectroscopic investigations by UV-Vis-and time-resolved laser-induced fluorescence (TRLF) spectroscopies, single component absorption and emission spectra are suggested for the (UO2)2 (OH) 2 2+ species. The lifetime 22 of the fluorescence emitting electronically excited state of (UO2)2(OH) 2 2+ was determined as 22 = 2.9 ± 0.9 s. The formation constant of (UO2)2(OH) 2 2+ was found to be log K22=–5.97 ± 0.06. Interpretation of the experimental data was also made assuming the species (UO2)2(OH) 2 2+ , but unsatisfactory results have been obtained.

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