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In this article I use ‘Tibullus’ as shorthand for ‘Tibullus and the rest of the Corpus Tibullianum ’, as the manuscripts discussed here attribute all these texts to the Augustan elegist. — The Budapest codex was

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Jelen tanulmány egy oktatástörténeti folyamatot vázol fel, amennyiben a kezdetektől (vagyis a legkorábbi föllelhető dokumentumoktól) 1945-ig vizsgálja Tibullus és Propertius előfordulását a magyarországi tankönyvekben. A dolgozat kitér az európai előzményekre és a magyar oktatáspolitika vonatkozó előírásaira is, mindenekelőtt azonban tartalmi és statisztikai összefoglalást nyújt arról, hogyan jelent meg a két szerző életműve a nyelvkönyvekben, antológiákban, irodalomtörténeti könyvekben és minden egyéb típusú tankönyvben: mely műveiket ismerték és olvasták, illetve hogyan értékelték irodalomtörténeti jelentőségüket.

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In his poetic collection, Tibullus often refers to the ancient household gods Lares. In this paper we will show that the prominent position Tibullus reserves for the Lares in his elegies proves that the poet agrees with Augustus’ programme of political and moral renovatio. Also we will point out how traditional worship in Augustan Rome is revived in order to serve both the religious and the political objectives of the Princeps.

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At the beginning of the 19th century, there was an intensive productive reception of the Corpus Tibullianum in Russian poetry, particularly of Tibullus’ elegy I 1. By analyzing the titles, the notes, and selected aspects of the main text of the six Russian translations of the elegy, Oraić Tolić’s Romantic notion of the paradigm shift from “illustrative” to “illuminative” quotation can be seen. However, this change does not take place in a linear fashion: Although the change in the titles and notes occurs in a consequential manner, the main texts meander between the stated poles.

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The Arcadian landscape was originally developed in Vergil to transcend an actual landscape and identify with an idealized setting temptingly abstract in order to serve as a metaphor for the redesigned pastoral genre as promoted in the Eclogues. Vergil’s Arcadia as described in Eclogue 4, for the first time in Latin literature, was a construction, a literary topos and a symbol of innovative poetics, but also of Roman history and contemporary politics interfused. Vergil’s Arcadia was an imaginary landscape. This utopia becomes — in full awareness of Vergil’s literary contemporaries and the poets following after them — an appropriate setting for the staging of imaginary literary dialogues between shepherds-poets, and the changing poetics is reflected on the changes of the archetypal landscape of the original Arcadia topography. These changes appear first in Tibullus (in selected passages from 1. 1, 1. 3, 1. 5, 1. 7, 1. 10, 2. 1, 2. 3 and 2. 5) and recur in new forms in Propertius, Horace and Ovid. The progress of transformation evidences Arcadia’s ability to observe the rules of different generic environments and anticipates the propagation of the particularly literary topos across the centuries, as a multi-leveled symbol of poetics, aesthetics and politics.

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