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significant difference was observed in total sugar content of concentrates produced by either the technique. 2.5 Effect of BFC and TC on the antioxidant property of juice Total phenolic content (TPC) of juice increased from 74.36 to 103.10 GAE/100 ml during 1

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* (brightness), a * (red/green), and b * (yellow/blue) using Konica Minolta CR 400 (Japan). 2.8 Total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity (AC) (flour and cookie) The TPC, DPPH (2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl), and ABTS (2,2′-azinobis [3

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ethanol) were evaluated for their potential use in purifying crude extracts of the apple pomace. Their effect on the recovery of total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity in terms of ferric reducing ability of plasma (FRAP) were evaluated

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total phenolic and total flavonoid content Total phenolic content (TPC) of the thyme leaf extracts was determined with the Folin−Ciocalteu (FC) reagent according to the method described by Singleton and Rossi (1965) . Gallic acid was

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Our study involved assessing new Hungarian multi-resistant apple cultivars (‘Artemisz’, ‘Hesztia’, ‘Rosmerta’, and ‘Cordelia’) and two commercial cultivars (‘Watson Jonathan’ and ‘Prima’). The samples were evaluated by a trained assessor panel applying computer supported profile analysis with 20 descriptive sensory parameters (using ProfiSens sensory assessment software). Beside the profiles of each cultivar we also showed the significant differences between the cultivars (LSD95%, LSD99%). The nutritional values were analysed using the MANOVA statistical method, the effects of significant factors on measured values were evaluated by using Tukey (P=0.05) post-hoc test, and we determined the homogeneous and heterogeneous groups based on that. Our study showed that PCA bi-plots containing sensory and instrumental value loadings together with the scores of apple cultivars make the complex relationships of each cultivar available for comparison. The results clearly showed that the intensity of the sour taste is inversely proportional to the carbohydrate-acid ratio determined by measurements. The flesh firmness and pectin content values obtained by instrumental measurements were found to be strongly correlated sensory parameters on crispness, texture, and ripeness. PCA plots proved to be very useful in demonstrating the parallelisms between instrumental-instrumental (TPC/FRAP) and sensory-sensory (shade/colour) parameter pairs, too. Our aggregated results show that the new Hungarian resistant apple cultivars have almost as good as or even better nutritional values than ‘Prima’ and ‘Jonathan’ (the latter dominated the Hungarian apple production for several decades). The new multi-resistant cultivars renew the range of apple cultivars available on the market, and they introduce new flavours to consumers.

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Fruit processing industries produce by-products that are good sources of natural antioxidants. These residuals are non-toxic and available in large quantities. A central composite design (CCD) and response surface methodology (RSM) were used to optimize experimental conditions. The processing variables were solvent type, solvent to solid ratio, ethanol concentration, temperature, and time. The responses were total phenolic content (TPC), scavenging activity of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, and yield. The optimal conditions were 70% ethanol— water mixture as a food grade solvent, temperature of 35 °C and extraction time 60 min for obtaining extracts with maximum of total phenolic content. Predicted values for total phenolic content in pear, apricot, and peach were 24.7, 19.3, and 10.4 mg gallic acid equivalents per 100 g fruit residual, respectively.

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Chakaiya variety of amla was investigated for its phenolic contents, and extracted phenolics from amla powder were evaluated for their antioxidant activity. RSM (response surface methodology) was used to determine the optimum conditions for maximum recovery of total phenolic content (TPC) and 2,6-diphenyl picryl hydrazil free radical (DPPH*) scavenging activity. The gelatine coating on banana slices before frying significantly reduced (approximately 60%) the fat uptake from oil during frying in comparison to control. The reduction of particle size to the nano range was found to be effective to load the antioxidants effectively. Antioxidant extracted from amla reduced the rate of oxidation of oil during frying and so it may be a better alternative of synthetic antioxidant in food products.

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Milled rice from nine aromatic cultivars was evaluated for physicochemical, cooking, and antioxidant properties. Physical parameters measured were milling outrun, head rice yield (HRY), and appearance (size and shape). Cooking time, water uptake ratio and elongation ratio were determined to study their cooking quality. Chemical parameters included were amylose content (AC), protein content (PC), gel consistency (GC) and alkali spreading value (ASV). Total phenolic content (TPC) was measured using the Folin-Ciocalteu method, while ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP), total antioxidant capacity (TAC), and 1,1-diphenylpicrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical scavenging activity were used to study their antioxidant activity. This study revealed all rice cultivars, except Basmoti-370 and Gopalbhog, showed HRY. Besides, all rice cultivars displayed high protein content. Significant variations (P<0.05) were found in TPC and the antioxidant activities of the rice cultivars. The correlation coefficient between the TPC and the antioxidant activities was strong and statistically significant (P<0.05).

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Acta Alimentaria
Authors:
F. Brahmi
,
S. Achat
,
I. Mateos-Aparicio
,
T. Sahki
,
O. Bedjou
,
N. Ben Bara
,
L. Benazzouz-Smail
,
H. Haddadi-Guemghar
,
K. Madani
, and
L. Boulekbache-Makhlouf

Abstract

This work proposes the optimisation of the ultrasound assisted extraction (UAE) for total phenolic content (TPC) from potato peels (PP). The optimised extract was obtained using ethanol 20% (v/v) for 30 min at 40 °C, and it was found to be rich in total phenolics (45.03 ± 4.16 mg GAE/g DM) and flavonoids (7.52 EQ/g DM) and exerted a good antioxidant effect with IC50s of 125.42 ± 2.78, 87.21 ± 7.72, and 200.77 ± 13.38 μg mL−1 for DPPH, phosphomolybdate, and FRAP, respectively. PP were used for the fresh cheese formulation, and this supplementation did not impact its physicochemical properties; however, the phenol content and antioxidant capacity of formulated cheeses were improved. PP-enriched fresh cheese presented a good acceptability, even better than the control.

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The outcome of various solvent extraction (water, methanol, acidic 50% methanol, 70% acetone, acidic 50% methanol followed by 70% acetone) on the total phenolic content (TPC) and antioxidant capacity of fruit pulp, seeds, leaves and stem bark of seabuckthorn (Hippophae rhamnoides L.) was investigated. The seabuckthorn extracts possess high phenolic content, 1666–13769 mg GAE/100 g d.w. The mean TPC was found highest in seeds (11148) followed by stem bark (10469), leaves (6330) and pulp (3579 mg GAE/100 g d.w.). In general, the 70% acetone and acidic 50% methanol followed by 70% acetone extracts was found to contain significantly higher TPC than those obtained in other extracting solvents. Antioxidant capacity in terms of IC50 value of pulp (3.39 mg ml−1) was up to 7.8 times higher than those reported for stem bark (0.43 mg ml−1) and up to 2.4 times higher than those found in seeds (1.4 mg ml−1). Further, antioxidant capacity by FRAP assay showed that the stem bark possess maximum antioxidant capacity (16.83) followed by seeds (15.26), leaves (12.73) and pulp (12.61), all as mM FeSO4. Significant correlation was found between TPC and antioxidant capacity by DPPH and FRAP assays.

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