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Central European Geology
Authors: Attila Ősi, Gábor Botfalvai, Edina Prondvai, Zsófia Hajdu, Gábor Czirják, Zoltán Szentesi, Emília Pozsgai, Annette E. Götz, László Makádi, Dóra Csengődi, and Krisztina Sebe

). B. Blazejowski 2004 Shark teeth from the Lower Triassic of Spitsbergen and their histology Polish Polar Research 25 153 167

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87 96 Sudar, M., K. Budurov 1979: New conodonts from the Triassic in Yugoslavia and Bulgaria. - Geol. Balcanica, 9/3, pp. 547 - 522, 3 pls., Sofia

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. Nagy E. Rálisch-Felgenhauer Török 1994 Triassic facies types, evolution and paleogeographic relations of the Tisza Megaunit

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I. Szabó Tóth-Makk 1990 The Lower Triassic sequences of the Dolomites (Italy) and Transdanubian Mid-Mountains (Hungary) and their correlation

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Cambridge University Press Cambridge, New York . D. Aljinović 1995 Storm influenced shelf sedimentation — an example from the Lower Triassic

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The Triassic karstic aquifer is the system with the greatest potential for the utilization of thermal waters in Serbia. As an integral part of the Dinaric tectonic unit, the Triassic aquifer extends widely over the western part of the Serbian territory and is characterized by cold waters. In contrast, the same but confined type of aquifer overlain by thick Tertiary sediments in the Pannonian Basin has significant geothermal potential. The major potential for tapping geothermal flow is in the southern and southwestern parts of the Pannonian Basin (Srem) and in the adjacent areas of Mačva and Semberija in the Sava tectonic graben. In these areas the Triassic karstic aquifer has been tapped by several boreholes with depths ranging from 400 m to 2400 m. The temperature of the hottest water exceeds 75 °C, while maximal discharge is 40 l/s.

Although the prospect of wider utilization of geothermal energy undoubtedly exists, some Serbian national plans count on a limited contribution of geothermal energy in renewable energy sources of only 4%. This is probably due to the low level of current utilization, and the inefficient use of even some highly productive wells with a high water temperature, such as those drilled in the most prosperous Mačva region.

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Farabegoli, E., M. C. Perri 1998 b: Stop 3.3B - Middle Triassic conodonts at the Pelsonian/Illyrian boundary of the Nosgieda section (Southern Alps, Italy). - In: M. Perri C., C. Spalletta (Eds): ECOS VII Southern Alps Field

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Acta Geologica Hungarica
Authors: János Haas, Kinga Hips, Pál Pelikán, Norbert Zajzon, Annette E. Götz, and Edit Tardi-Filácz

Góczán, F., J. Haas, A. Oravecz-Scheffer 1987: Permian-Triassic boundary in the Transdanubian Central Range. - Acta Geol. Hung., 30, pp. 35-58. Permian-Triassic boundary in the Transdanubian Central Range

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(Hungary) in the light of Triassic palaeomagnetic data. - Geophysical Journal International, 134, pp. 625-633. The bending model of the Transdanubian Central Range (Hungary) in the light of Triassic palaeomagnetic data

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