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Along their long history, Turkic languages got into contact with numerous other languages, amongst which was also Chinese. Many Chinese Buddhist works were translated into Uighur, and, as a matter of course, these translations activated loans in Uighur from Chinese. Several studies have dealt with the Chinese loans in Uighur, and most of them regard Uighur čog ‘glowing heat, flame; splendour’ as a word of Chinese origin. The present paper carefully investigates the word čog and the words related to it in Old Turkic, and comes to the conclusion that the Chinese derivation of the word is not so obvious, since that explanation is aggravated by serious difficulties. Instead, on the basis of Turkic linguistic data, the author offers new ideas for explaining the Uighur word čog.

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Three leaves written in Brāhmī script and kept in the Dunhuang Research Academy turn out to be parts of a bilingual text of Dharmaśarīrasūtra in Sanskrit and Uighur. After analysing several versions of Dharmaśarīrasūtra, it can be inferred that these three fragments belong to the Northern Brāhmī recensions which were circulated along the Northern Silk Road and are different from the Southern Brāhmī recensions popular along the Southern Route, such as the Khotanese version. This paper attempts to transcribe these fragments and make a thorough research on Dharmaśarīrasūtra, taking five relevant Chinese versions into account.

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. Fu Ma 付馬 and Xia Lidong 夏立棟 2021. ‘Comprehensive Study on Old Uighur and Chinese Wall Inscriptions in Room B of Newly Excavated Cave 26 in Tuyuq Grottoes, Turfan.’ Acta Orientalia Hung. 74

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In the Mongol period, the Uighurs who settled around the Turfan region not only translated Chinese Buddhist works into the Uighur language, but also directly copied them in Chinese characters or composed original works with the combination of arbitrary quotations from Chinese works. The Insadi-Sūtra is such a work in question. The author of this paper succeeded in identifying two Chinese Buddhist texts written by Uighurs. They will help us better understand the background in which these Uighur-Chinese mixed texts came about.

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Textes versehen . Leiden : E. J. Brill . Oda Juten 1996 . ‘A Fragment of the Old Uighur Avalokiteśvara-Sūtra with Notes.’ In: R. E Emmerick , W Sundermann , I Warnke and P Zieme (eds.) Turfan, Khotan und Dunhuang. Vorträge der

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References 1.Primary sources Gaochangguan zazi 高昌館雜字 [Sino-Uighur dictionary in the Ming time] . In: Beijing tushuguan guji zhenben congkan 北京圖書館古籍珍本叢刊 [Series of rare old books housed in the Beijing library] vol. 6 . Beijing : Beijing

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Recently we found 25 folios in Uighur of the the so-called “Abitaki” text in Beijing. The word “Abitaki” (< Chinese “Amituojing/Amitaking = Sanskrit Amitābha-sūtra) is used only as a code name written in small letter on the left side of some folios of the manuscript. But it has nothing to do with the famous scripture “Amitābha-sūtra” (one chapter, translated into Chinese by Kumārajīva in the 4th century AD). I hold that it belongs to a lost Buddhist Chinese book called “Da Bai Lian She Jing” (The Great White Lotus Society Sūtra) consisting of 4 chapters of the Pure Land School and it was copied in Yuan Dynasty (1279-1368). Here I study and publish 2 folios (belonging to the 3rd chapter) of the text. The whole text will be published in the near future.

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Recently we found 25 folios of the so-called Abitaki Uighur text in the Beijing National Library. The word “Abitaki”(<Chinese “Amituojing/Amitaking = Sanskrit Amitābha-sūtra) is used only as a code name written in small letter on the left side of some folios of the manuscript. But it has nothing to do with the famous scripture “Amitābha-sūtra”(one chapter, translated into Chinese by Kumārajīva in the 4th century AD). I hold that it belongs to a lost Buddhist Chinese book called “Da Bai Lian She Jing”(The Great Lotus Society Sutra) consisting of four chapters of the Pure Land Schooland it was copied during theYuan Dynasty (1279-1368). Here I am studying and pub­lishing another two folios (belonging to the 3rd chapter) of the text.

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In the present article some unpublished Buddhist Sogdian texts belonging to the German Turfan collection are studied. Apart from a small fragment from the Sogdian version of the Pañcaviṃśatisāhasrikā-mahā-prajñāpāramitā-sūtra , I selected those texts which belong to categories unknown or not well represented among the Buddhist Sogdian texts published so far. Thus, specimens of the vinaya literature, Zen Buddhism and apocryphal texts are cited. One group of fragments contains Tocharian loanwords and is likely to have been translated from Tocharian, while another group is unique in that it is provided with a colophon in the Uighur language. Finally, various forms denoting “bodhisattva” are collected and in light of their distribution and number of occurrences among the texts I challenge the generally accepted view that they came into Sogdian via Parthian, and that the Uighur form bodisavt had its origin in Sogdian.

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Abstract

In this paper, the author presents a fragment of a translation of the Abidharmakośabhāṣya into Old Uighur preserved at the National Library of China, Beijing. This leaf can be connected to the Abidharmakośabhāṣya fragments preserved at the Ethnographic Museum in Stockholm and studied by Shōgaito Masahiro. Through an examination of the size, form, handwriting, etc., we conclude that all the Abidharmakośabhāṣya texts preserved in Stockholm, Kyoto, Beijing, Lanzhou, and Hangzhou belong to one and the same manuscript.

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