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Choi, Han-Woo (1988): On Some Chinese Loan Words in Uighur. CAJ Vol. 32, Nos 1–2, pp. 161–169. Choi H-W On Some Chinese Loan Words in Uighur CAJ

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( 2012 ): Two More Leaves of the Dharmaśarīrasūtra in Sanskrit and Uighur . Historical and Philological Studies of China’s Western Regions (西域歷史語言研 究集刊) Vol. 5 , pp. 145 – 155

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Tocharischen (forthcoming). Kitsudō, K. (2011): Khitan influences on Uighur Buddhism. In: Manuscripts through the Ages (forthcoming). Kudara, K. (1984): A Preliminary Study of an Uigur Version

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Kahar Barat (1987): Fragmentary Biography of Hui-yuan in Uighur. Wenwu [Cultural Relics] no. 5. Kudara, K.-Zieme, P. (1985): Uiguru no go Kammuriōjukio (Amitāyurdhyāna-sūtra) (Guanwuliangshoujing

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. — Sims-Williams, N. (Hrsgg.): Languages and Scripts of Central Asia . London, S. 1–15. Moerloose, Eddy (1980): Sanskrit Loan Words in Uighur. Journal of Turkish Studies 4, S. 61

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Recently we found 25 folios of the so-called Abitaki Uighur text in the Beijing National Library. The word “Abitaki”(<Chinese “Amituojing/Amitaking = Sanskrit Amitābha-sūtra) is used only as a code name written in small letter on the left side of some folios of the manuscript. But it has nothing to do with the famous scripture “Amitābha-sūtra”(one chapter, translated into Chinese by Kumārajīva in the 4th century AD). I hold that it belongs to a lost Buddhist Chinese book called “Da Bai Lian She Jing”(The Great Lotus Society Sutra) consisting of four chapters of the Pure Land Schooland it was copied during theYuan Dynasty (1279-1368). Here I am studying and pub­lishing another two folios (belonging to the 3rd chapter) of the text.

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Abstract

In this paper, the author presents a fragment of a translation of the Abidharmakośabhāṣya into Old Uighur preserved at the National Library of China, Beijing. This leaf can be connected to the Abidharmakośabhāṣya fragments preserved at the Ethnographic Museum in Stockholm and studied by Shōgaito Masahiro. Through an examination of the size, form, handwriting, etc., we conclude that all the Abidharmakośabhāṣya texts preserved in Stockholm, Kyoto, Beijing, Lanzhou, and Hangzhou belong to one and the same manuscript.

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In V. Gordlevskij’s words, “In order to understand the history of Turkic peoples it is necessary to study the Mongols”. But the other way round is also true: in order to understand the history of the Mongols a knowledge of Turkic history is indispensable. The present article tries to elucidate some aspects of the Turkic impact on Mongol history by investigating the role of the Turks (Uighurs, Kipchaks and Kanglis) who stood in the service of the Yuan, Mongol dynasty of China in the 13th–14th centuries.

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In this paper five new and unpublished fragments of a Buddhist sutra in Uighur script will be presented. According to our research, they belong to The Scripture of the Divine Spell of the Eight Yang of Heaven and Earth Spoken by the Buddha, i.e., säkiz yükmäkyaruq sudur (SYY) (Fo shuo tiandi bayang shenzhou jing 佛說天地八陽神咒經, T85n2897). The first three fragments (T2 a/b, T3, T4) from Turfan were discovered by our technicians during their protection work of the cultural relics section while they were classifying, cleaning and repairing other objects. Due to several reasons, these documents have not been numbered up to now. Advised by our technicians we have numbered them with the capital letter T. Two fragments (U1895 a/b and U1896 a/b) belong to the Turfan Collection of Berlin. The paper mainly gives transcriptions, translations, and notes.

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DĀ = Dīrghāgama DKPAM St.P. = Shōgaito, M. — Tugusheva, L. — Fujishiro, S. (1998): Uiguru bun Daśakarmapathāvadānamālā-no kenkyū Sankutopeteruburugu shozō’tō-gyō-dō monogatari.’/ The Daśakarmapathāvadānamālā in Uighur

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