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Richard Wagner's edition of the Stabat mater by Palestrina calls for a special attention among the 19th century transcriptions and practice editions of the work, since Franz Liszt declared it to be a masterpiece to be followed by others throughout his life, albeit he knew and appreciated editions with historical aspect, too. Wagner prepared his version of Palestrina's composition in 1848 for his historical concert in Dresden, and it was published on the recommendation of Liszt in 1878 by Christian Friedrich Kahnt. The study summarizes the documents of the genesis of Wagner's work with the background of Palestrina's Stabat mater editions before 1878, and tries to preveal Wagner's concept and musical decisions in the light of the performing practice of the Cappella Sistina of the time, as well as following the main aspects in the review by Franz Xaver Witt published in 1878.

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Wagner, R.: Mein Leben. Hrsg. von Gregor-Dellin, M. List Verlag, München, 1977. Wagner R. Mein

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vonatkozásai 2008 Vámos É.: A két kémikus Wágner. Dr. Wágner Dániel (1800–1890) vegyész-gyógyszerész és fia, prof

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Opera is an exceedingly multiform and multilayered genre which has in its disposition as Gesamtkunstwerk not only to meet the most varied artistic demands, but which because of the great spiritual and pecuniary expenditure necessary for its production, also takes a highly exposed position in the sociocultural environment of its birth and performance. As courtly opera it served the representation and increase of dynastic glory, in the guise of the German Singspiel it strengthened bourgeois self-esteem and as rescue opera it compensated collective anxiety states. The early romantic claim of music to be considered as Kunstreligion was transferred to opera by Richard Wagner who as Ludwig van Beethoven’s self-appointed heir catapulted himself in the position of a Führer of the bourgeois society with the aim to give through his works trend-setting impulses for its further development. His adaptations of German myths exerted a dominating influence and have found a diversified following. As componists of monumental operas are primarily to be named August Bungert, Felix von Weingartner, Felix Draeseke, Max von Schillings, Cyrill Kistner and last but not least Richard Strauss.

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The first part of the present documentary publishes fifty-one autograph letters and five short notes of Ferenc Liszt from the collection of the Berlin State Library, written in French and German between 1836 and 1886. Some of those written to music publisher Hermann Härtel concern the edition of compositions such as Consolations and Études ďexécution transcendante, while others touch on his transcriptions. Other letters are addressed to various musicians, friends, lady-friends, etc., among them Richard Wagner and C. F. Weitzmann. In the second part there follow sixteen documents from the Library of the Frankfurt University, among them a receipt of 200 francs from the Duchess of Berry to the young artist in 1824.

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It is strange to find Wagner and Offenbach mentioned together at the time of their reception in nineteenth-century Budapest, and measured against each other in the Hungarian press. This study seeks to interpret that juxtaposition in terms of the system of theatrical institutions in Budapest at the time. Factors identified that concern directly the way Hungarians received the two stage composers are the multinational, multicultural character of theater life, the want of distinctions between genres, and the ongoing changes in the institutional system of the theater.

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In 1915 Otto Wagner, the school-founding master of modern Central European architecture, was asked to share with his Hungarian colleagues his thoughts on the tasks of modern architecture, including his views on the issue of the potentials of national architecture. The elderly Austrian architect replied in a letter, which appeared in Budapest’s leading architectural journal of the age, Vállalkozók Lapja. Based on this scarcely known letter and its Hungarian reception that together form an important episode in the discourse on national art and architecture, my paper investigates the conflicting ideals of nationalism and/or modernism, ideals that bear significance to architecture history, urbanism and the formation of national identity alike.

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2-3 9 21 Wágner I. (2004a): A magyar pénzügyi (közvetítö) rendszer térszerkezeti elemzése nemzetközi kitekintéssel. PhD Kézirat

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Abstract

Recent studies of formal structure in themes in the Classical repertoire (William Caplin) as well as the music of Wagner (Matthew BaileyShea) point towards the enormous importance and potential of the Sentence phrase structure with its hybrid forms for analyzing tonal music. Initially described by Schoenberg, a Sentence is phrase consisting two main events of equal length, a presentation phrase (consisting of one repeated basic idea) and a continuation phrase. In this paper I will demonstrate Bartók's dependence upon Classical and Romantic phrase structures, including the Sentence, and also the Classical Period (consisting of an antecedent and consequent phrase). In both his small-and large-scale works, Bartók's sentences display a Classical coherence, despite the lack of a functional harmonic framework, due to their clear formal articulation and clearly defined modal pitch centers. Bartók also utilized chains of Sentences, Satzketten, in several works including Concerto for Orchestra. I will describe the different paradigmatic types utilized by Bartók in works such as Divertimento, the String Quartets, along with the Violin and Piano Concertos. Particularly significant is how Bartók alters the repeated basic idea and elaborates the continuation phrase and the creation of compound forms.

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